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Full text of "Irving centennial, 1863-1963"

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Ir8i 



CMTfflliL 



1863 



1963 



UNIVERSITY OF 

ILLir ■^' '^RARY 

AT UR^.u.,., ^ .AMPAIGN 

ILL HIST. SURVEY 



ILLI^iC rCAL SUBVET 






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iJij. M"' 



Sfl'^—^l 



FOREWORD 



Our Centennial calls to mind many mem- 
ories, some long forgotten as well as those 
which remain fresh and vivid after so many- 
years. 

During the early eighteen hundreds, 
pioneers from the East were settling in the 
prairies between the Appalachian Mountains 
and the Mississippi River. Farming was the 
main industry in the beginning but not for- 
long. Other industries and educational ad- 
vantages followed as settlers continued co- 
ming. As a result of these migrations Irv- 
ing came to be. 

Our many thanks to all those who in 
the past have contributed so much to the 
welfare of our village and to those who 
will carry on to insure its future as an 
enterprising community. 

This is not a complete record but it 
is offered with a hope that many events and 
people long thought forgotten can be reliv- 
ed in memory. 

We are grateful to those who have help, 
ed supply information of a one hundred year 
backward look. 



OUR TOWN'S CENTENNIAL 



One hundred years ago this fall, 

Men met to incorporate a village for all; 

Irving was just a settlement, 

No laws or anything permanent. 

Then no stock could roam the street. 
Boardwalks were made for less muddy feet. 
Lots of changes were made, 
Trees were planted around for shade. 

Trees were planted for a park, 
Ice cream picnics held there after dark; 
It was surrounded by a hitching rack, 
From which many a child fell on his back. 

The settlers in 1857 made a gain, 

They got the railroad and a train; 

Then to up their popularity and rank. 

They got more stores, a post office and a bank. 

They got a barber shop, a millinery store, 
A lumber yard and lots more; 
Five well attended churches they had 
For happy occasions and also sad. 

They of course had schools, 

Carpenters made furniture with crude tools; 

Now lots of thingr, have come to pass, 

Such as electricity, city water, and natural gas. 

Selma Kelly Eddington 



Irving is a grand old place to live in. 
To lend, to spend or to give in; 
But to borrow or to beg or to hold your own, 
There never was a place worse known. 

Written many years ago by Harvey Kelly. 




IRVING INCORPORATED 

In 1863 the village of Irving was incorporated and received its 
charter. Cornelius Newberry was chosen president and Dr. William Hobson 
clerk for the purpose of conducting an- election. Palmer Yeamans, John 
Petra, Jacob Bird, H. J. Huestis and William P. Saunders were elected 
trustees of the village. After being duly sworn in, election of offi- 
cers was held in the store of H. J. Huestis and included president of 
the board, J.H. Petra; clerk, E.H. Kitch; treasurer, William Grantham; 
street commissioner, John Franklin; and constable, Isaiah Grantham, 

Several ordinances were voted on including a fine of not less 
than $5.00 for playing cards or other games for money in the village; 
a fine of $5.00 for anyone running a horse or mule unnecessarily; a 
license rate for shows was from $1. to $2,00; and all able bodied male 
inhabitants over twenty-one years of age and under fifty were required 
to do not less than 3 days labor on the streets and roads after due 
notice from the street commissioner. The pay was to be $1.00 per day. 
These ordinances were signed by John Petra, president and E, H, Kitch, 
clerk. 

Future regular meetings were to be held once a month on the first 
Saturday night after the full of the moon. 

Presidents of the Village Bd., listed in the order in which they- 
served include Cornelius Newberry, John Petra, Thomas Black, M. D. L. 
Cannon, Dr. Joseph Cobb, H. J. Huestis, Palmer Yeaman, John E. Knight, 
J.B. Cromer(who always opened the meetings with prayer ) ,M.D.L. Cannon, 
Athan Cannon, J. T. McDavid, E.H. Kitch, John K. Knight, F.P. Huestis, 
John T. McDavid, H.C. Yeamans, S.J, Cottrell, John Bryan, John Knight, 
R.J. Cockelreas, J. M. Kelly, H.J. Bartlett, J. Piatt, Easton Whitten, 
A, Ridenhour, Baxter Williams, Thomas Grantham, Ellis Satterlee, CM. 
Roberts, W. J. Wiley, Ward Carter, Cyrus Vandever, Dr. P.J. Fullerton, 
Robert L. Funk, William Counton, Marshall Winn, G.W. Doyle, CF. Laws, 
Ed Lohr, J.M, Vincent, L.L. Cunningham, Ira Arnold, B. C. Tomamichel,- 
G.W. Doyle, C Cockelreas, John Potterf, Lee Hutchins, Pearl Carriker, 
Charles C. Nance, George C Bryce, William K. Jenkens, Edwin Renken 
W.D. Fisher, John Walters, and the present president, Harold Jurgena, 

The present town clerk is David Wineburner; Treasurer, Wayne — 
Eddington; trustees, Allen Edwards, Kenneth Manning, Harold Douglas, - 
Roy Denton, Ross McPherson, and Homer Rebman, 



^^^ 



WELCOME TO IRVING 

Welcome sign erected in 1962 at the 
corner Main and Pine Street which- 
is at the beginning of the State 
Aid road leading to coffeen. 



IRVING ILLINOIS 

MRTIIiRiJATEWAY 

3#s 



CENTENNIAL OFFICERS 

Mary K. (Toots) Bryce - President 

David Wineburner - Secretary 

George Bryce - Treasurer 

Harold Jurgena - Auditor 





CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 



Front row, left to righti Phyllis Whalen, Judith Gates, Betty 
Caulk, Mildred Wilson, Alma Rushford. 

Back row; left to right: Harold Jurgena, Allen Edwards, Everett 
Spindel, Faye Holmes, Ross McPherson, Floyd Bauer. 

Chairmen not pictured are Kenneth Caulk and Dennis Edwards. 




A GROUP OF CENTENNIAL WORKERS 

Front row, left to right: Freda Perkins, Luthella McPherson, 
Mildred Wilson, Martha Wineburner, Kimberly WineburneT» Alma Rush- 
ford, Dorothy Maninfior, Bessie Bailey. 

Back row, left to right: Ross Perkins, Ross McPherson, David Wine 
burner, Betty Caulk, Everett Spindel, Judith Gates, Floyd Bauer, Mary 
K, Bryce, Ora Zumwalt, Roberta Bauer, Ruth Zumwalt, Helen Bryce, Phy- 
llis Whalen. 
Many others not pictured have been enthusiastic and faithful workers. 

JUNIOR QUEEN CANDIDATES 
Carol Randle, Janice Spindel, Diana Bailey, Barbara Bailey, Janet 
Maninfior, Juanita Denton, Linda Bledsaw, Judy Durston, Fern White, 
Patsy Kelly. 

SENIOR QUEEN CANDIDATES 
Anna Canaday, representing the Christian church; Mary Lipe, Luth- 
eran church; Esther Schraudt, Methodist church; Nellie Carriker, Free 
Methodist church; Mary Padgett, Order of Eastern Star; Ruth Zumwalt, 
American Legion Auxiliary. 

Remember when tne kiqb followed the ice wagon 
in the hope of getting stray chunks of ice? 



Remember when there were such big snows that 
people could v/alk or ride across rail fences? 



Compliments of 
g« Automatic Open Bowling 

A.M.F. Call 27 For 
pin Sitters Reservations 


TOWN PUMP 


BOWL 


NOKOMIS. ILLLINOIS 

CO, fee Congo A Cocktail 

Bar N Lounge 

D 

jewel 

proprietors 


Best Wishes 


FUNKS SERVICE 

MARATHON PRODUCTS 


Lubricotion.-Tire Repair 
Goodyear Tires 










SULLIVAN'S DRUGS 




i?c liable P resort r>-tt on Sckvicov 




HII.LSBORO 





CENTENNIAL COMMITTEES 



President — 
Secretary — 

FINANCE 
Alma Rushford 
Ross Perkins 
Wayne Eddington 
Helen Norris 
Larry McElroy 
Frances White 
Rev, Lon Sefton 
Faye Renken 
Bessie Bailey 
Mary Rebman 
James Dalzotto 



QUEEN - PROMOTIONAL 
Phyllis Whalen 
Barbara (Lynn) Caulk 
Betty Edwards 
Linda Edwards 
Vera White 
Bonnie Schwendemann 
Mary Taylor 
Barbara Denton 
Florence Douglas 
Lila Chaplin 
Roberta Bauer 
Phyllis Uhlry 



BEARD 

Mildred Wilson 
Dorothy Maninfior 
Norma Caulk 
Luthella McPherson 
Barbara Neisler Caulk 
Esther Strackeljahn 
Ruby Renken 
Helen Rice 

PUBLICITY 
Everett Spindel 
Robert Eddington 
James White 
Forrest Snow 
Esther Schraudt 



Mary K. Bryce 
David Wineburner 



CENTENNIAL BOOK 

Faye Holmes 

Etta King 

Edith Grantham 

Nell Botkin 

Ina Botkin 

Ava Wells 

Edna Kelly 

Alice Schoeneweis 

Leda Davis 

Estelle Downs 



Treasurer — George Bryce 
Auditor Harold Jurgena 

SOLICIT FOR BOOK 
Betty Caulk 
Jean Eddington 
Dolores Eddington 
Charlotte Snow 
Sophia Kesky 
Wanda White 
Livona Martincic 
Everett Spindel 
Betty Settle 
George Bryce 



CONCESSION 
Ross WcPherson 
Charles McNeely 
Lynn Eddington 
Helen Bryce 
Arline Cook 
Roberta Bauer 
Stanley Everley 
Rev, David Lofdahl 
Roy Denton 
Louise Singler 
Mary Anna McElroy 
Marcella Douglas 



ENTERTAINMENT 
Harold Jurgena 
Ross McPherson 
Homer Rebman 
Wilma Tomamichel 
Dale Renken 
James Whalen 
Jean Weber 



HORSE SHOES 
Kenneth Caulk 
Bradley Caulk 
Arthur Smith 
Ivan Caulk 



PARK 

Dennis Edwards 
Robert Caulk 
Jake Bergman 
Bud Denton 
Joe Maninfior 
Floyd Bauer 
Henry Schwendemann 
Kenneth Manning 
Harold Douglas 
Charles Kesky 
Jack Bailey 
Thomas Rice 
Walter Heifer 
Richard Chaplin 

PARADE 

Allen Edwards 

Lamar Caulk 

Melvin "Pappy" Stokes 

Shirley Randle 

Rev, David Dyer 



ANTIQUE DISPLAY 
Judith Gates 
Nina White 



Remember when Guc Rebman operated a small business at his home 
which consisted of making hominy, butchering and rendering lard which 
he distributed in the community? 



-HAPPY BIRTHDAY- 


STAUDER'S INC. 


Har dwar •■ Fwrn itur • 


H«ating A Plumbing 


PHONE Z92.t WITT. ILLINOIS 


•'" HILLSBORO 


LUMBER CO. 


Shirley Collins, Mgr. 


Wh«r« Th« Home Begins 


Lumb«r ft Building Material 


„„,33^^^ ,^^,^^,3 


STURGEON'S 

Gifts — Cards — Staaonery 
School and Office Supplies 


Inttrnatlenal HarvMttr 
Tractors - Farm Equlpmont 

BULLARD IMPLEMENT GO. 


Hlllsboro, lUlnols 
Phone KSIlogrg Z-SSZi 


Hllltboro, llltnelt 



EARLY HISTORY OF IRVING 

Irving actually began in the early part of the nineteenth century. 
After Illinois was admitted into the Union in 1818 more settlors began 
moving into its fertile prairies in greater numbers. The pioneers came 
from the Carolinas, Tennessee and Kentucky and traveled by covered- 
wagons and on horseback. 

The first pioneer to settle in this vicinity was John Lawrence 
Franklin in 1826. Others soon followed. John Lipe settled in the north 
ern part of the township in 1828. James Kelly settled where the Irving 
Cemetery is now located, the graves are where their cabin first stood. 
They were the parents of ten children. Ezra Bostick, a revolutionary 
soldier settled nearby and the following year, he was joined by Mark 
and James Rutledge and Joel Knight, all from Kentucky. 

During the early 1830s other settlers included Andrew King and 
son, John Wesley with Noah Kelly, James Madison Berry, Rev. John Grant 
ham vath a family of thirteen children, John and V.'illiam Wiley, the 
Carrikers, Hefleys, and Bosts. In a few years, the Gregory, Neisler, 
Lewey, Roberts, Lyerla, Christian, Morain, McDavid, Mann, fatterlee, 
Hightower, and Berry Families followed. 

In 1844 Jacob Bohn^ s father came from North Carolina in a one 
horse wagon with a family of eight. Mrs. Bohn died on the way and was 
buried in Tennessee. 

A Mr. Irving opened a little store in 1844 and was honored by hav 
ing the village named for him. Another store was built in 1847 by Ed- 
wards and Petra. 

In 1854, Madison Berry sold land to Mr. Higgins and Mr. Ridai of 
Alton. They made the railroad survey and the road was 3raded, the 
village was platted and the town laid out. R.W.Davis and Madison Berry 
bought out the promoters and began at once tr make improvements c Mr. 
Perry donated the ground for the park, to be used for recreation. 
T.G. Black and W.S. Berry erected a store house on the east side 
of the railroad tracks facing the railroad. In fact, all the early 
stores on either side of the railroad were built to face the tracks. 
Land at that time was plantod in corn and was fenced with rails, so 
in going to the stores, the fence had to be laid down to get there 
A brick store was built by H.J. Huestis in 1856 and W.Jo McCiure- 
built the Irving Hotel. A passenger train stopped each morning while 
passengers and train crew v.ere served breakfast at this hotel. At this 
time, W. W, Wiley was railroad agent and post master. He and Mr. Black 
built a large store house and in 1859 they built the first two brick 
buildings in the village. 

In 1855 a steam flour mill was erected by Kelly and Wiley. A 
second mill was built by Hanners and Williams in 1868. H.M. Kelly also 
operated a mill which he bought and moved into the village, and Ezek- 
iel Grantham operated a mill at one time. 

In 1870 and 1871 two large elevators were built along the rail- 
road to handle grain in bulk. 

A Mr. Sanford built the first blacksmith shop and other black 
smiths included D.H. Luther, A.M. Edwards, J. Scherer and Mr. Bell. 

Among others who contributed to the progress of the village and 
township were Isaac Lewey, C.B. Cromer, John McDavid, Milton Berry, 
Charles McKinney, Dr. R. Parkhill, John Wiley, Sam Wiley, Noah Taylor, 
Jacob Lewey, George File, Marvin Thumb, Marshall Winn, Henry Latham, 
Samuel Bartlett, James Morain and many others. The descendants of many 
of these earlier settlers still reside in Irving. 

Before much longer, the village had a clothing store, hardware 
stores, millinery shops, restaurants, bank, weekly newspaper, livery 
stables, and harness shops. 

9 



COMPLIME NTS 
O F 



4 

'Witt 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation WITT< ILLINOIS 

RUFUS NIEMI 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 

SPECIALIZING - IN -FARM SALES 
Home Addrat* Home Phone 

524 t. Union St. KOKOMIS ILLINOIS 3^6 



CONGRATULATIONS 
From 

A FRIEND 



10 



EARLY HISTORY OF IRVING 



The early settlers lived 
They gathered together at par 
parings, carpet rag tackings 
according to old tales, now 
by the pranksters. 

Many changes occurred d 
main street stores were chang 
ings replaced the old ones de 
giving a double track to St.L 
replaced the blacksmith shops 
automobiles made passenger 
stables discontinued to opera 
duced to one track. The pres 
and contract only distant ha 
the depot has been razed. 

Various other businesse 
is surely a permanent thing, 
petuate its growth, instead 
some extent becone more or le 
citizens are justly proud. 



humble, economical and 
ties, corn huskings, lo 
, spelling bees and si 
and then some skuldugge 

uring the early and mi 
ed to face the present h 
stroyed by fire, a new r 
ouis, later garages and 
, truck service replaced 
service by train unpro 
te and the double railr 
ent freight trains are a 
uling. There is no pass 

s have come and gone. 
Irving, having no major 
of becoming an industria 
ss a residential village 



industrial lives, 
g rollings, apple 
nging schools and 
ry was promoted— 

ddle 1900s. the 
ighway, new build 
ailroad was built 
service stations- 
freight by train 
fitable, livery 
oad track was re- 
11 through trains 
enger service and 

In fact changes 
industries to per 
1 area, it has to 

of which we, its 



**** 



BUILDINGS ON PINE STREET IN EARLY 
1900s 
Joseph Platt->s Harness and Buggy 
Shop, File and Fowler Hardware Sto- 
re, 





T.R. COFFEY IN HIS COBBLER SHOP 
-about 1896 

T.R. Coffey repaired and made 
shoes for people in the community 
who had difficulty in finding shoes 
to fit. 



11 



LANDSCAPING SHRUBS EVERGREENS 

DON BEELER MELVA BEELER 

PHONE KE2 5651 GAROLD CHRISTIAN ROUTE 16 

WITT 4138 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



636 W. TREMONT 
AND 



OWNERS 

HOWARD WHITTEN ^ «^ ^ , ,. . 

WM. SATTGAST FREE DELIVERY MEMBER OF F.I.D.A. 



NOKOMIS ^"^ "^'""^ 24 HOUR 

ILL. SERVICE 

NOKOMIS COIN OPERATED LAUNDRY 
DRY CLEANING 

21 WASHERS 2 DOUBLE LOAD WASHERS 

lODRYERS HAIR DRYER 

DRY CLEANING LAUNDRY Owned & 

owned by SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS oPerated by 

KEEL'S & SATTERLEE VORIS SATTERLEE 



RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL 

HILLSBORO ROOFING 
SUPPLY CO. 

SIDING ALL TYPES 
BOB BOSTON PHONE KE2 2647 JIM PIAZZA 

12 



EARLY AND INTERESTING ORDINANCES 

In April 1867 the village board voted to make board walks, boards 
to be one inch thick with sills four feet apart, and street crossings 
to be two inches thick in oak lumber and twenty inches wide. 

The president cf the beard announced that the first Sat. night 
each month after the full of the moon would be meeting night. 

Regulating the rate of speed of railroad , trains-" Be it ordained- 
by the president and trustees of the board that the rate of speed for 
trains and hand cars on the St. Louis, Alton, and Terrehaute Railroads 
within the incorporation of Irving shall not be more than five miles 
per hour," 

In 1870 it was voted to levy an additional tax of one percent 
on all property to assist the Indianapolis and St. Louis Railroad in 
building a "Depot House" and that the public square be fenced. Bid 
s for the fencing were submitted by Silas Kelly, Hunter and Satterlee 
J.M. Taulbce, and H.M. Kelly. H.M. Kelly had the lowest bid of $156,90 
and was given the contract. 

Samuel F.King was appointed attorney for the town and a committee 
drew designs for d public house for the corporation with a calaboose 
attached in the same year. 

1872, an ordinance was passed relative to boys getting on and off 
trains in the corporate limits of the village. 

1873, the board voted that weighing scales and hog pens on the 
corner of State and Pine Streets near the business house of M.A. Satt- 
erlee was a public nuisance and were to be removed. 

November , 1891 it was voted to hire C, P, Satterlee to attend to the 
calaboose and street lamps for five dollars per month, 

August, 1893 Ridgeway Addition was laid out, platted and added to 
the village of Irving. 

1898, the Modern Woodmen of America was granted exclusive right 
of the street and park for Fourth of July Celebration} An ordinance 
granting Howett and J. J. Frey a twenty year franchise to erect poles, 
wiies and apparatus in the streets, alleys and public places for the 
purpose of installing a telephone system; voted to turn all tramps 
kept overnight in the calaboose out on Saturday morning in order that- 
they get out of town; and several brick walks were laid. 

Early 1900s, Electric light at side of Winn^s crossing was to be 
rented from Hillsboro Electric Co. foraa term of ten years; A twenty 
five series of Tungstin lights at various places in the village would 
burn each night except when the moon shone brightly, cost- twenty four 
dollars per year; voted to give Peoples' Mutual Telephone Company the 
privilege of using streets and alleys for the erection of telephone 
poles; Ordinance in relation to granting franchise for electric light 
and power permit was given Hillsboro Electric Light and Power Company 
to erect poles in streets, alleys and public places for the purpose of 
conveying electricity; and a special ordinance for constructing side- 
walks on some streets was approved. 

1911, Every ablebodied male inhabitant of the village between the 
ages of twenty one and fifty except campers, idiots, or lunatics shall 
labor on the streets and alleys for twenty days each year or pay Into 
the village treasury $1.50 or be prosecuted (put into the calaboose) 
with only clean water and well baked bread 3 times a day. If he is- 
still stubborn, he will be placed in solitary confinement; declared 
unlawful to permit any wooden box to be used for spittoon purposes; 
Anyone riding a horse or mule in any street or alley in the "village at 



13 



Hillsboro National Bank 




Capital $300,000.00 Surplus $000,000.00 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Serving All of Montgomery County 



FURNITURE 
^123.425 SouiS M.in Str. 



FLOOR COVERING 



APPLIANCES 

Phone KEIIoog 2-3916 



LATHAM FURNITURE, Inc. 

Box in • HILLSBORO, ILLINOIS 



C. R. NAIL 



THE STORE FOR MEN AND BOYS 
HILLSBORO, ILLINOIS 



Phone KE. 2-5127 



C. W. TRITT 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 



1007 VANDAL1A RD. 



LSBDRD, ILL- 



14 



Early and Interesting Ordinances 

a speed of more than ten miles per hour shall be fined, and speed in 
turning from one street to another shall be at five miles per hour; 
No animal or geese shall be allowed to run at large within corporate 
limits; and more concrete walks were constructed. 

1917, Fred Keisling was appointed village marshal. 

1919, Harry Truitt was appointed to rope off Main Street for the 
free Saturday night movies. . r- » 

1924, Botkin and Funk pool room was given a license and C. M. 
Crissman was appointed to assist policeman during the free shows. 

1934, Howard Davis was elected policeman. 

1935, A wage scale was set at thirty five cents per hour for com- 
mon labor in the village. 

1942, Voted to contact W.P.A. and request an allotment of labor 
and material for a drainage project. 

1954, Illinois Power Company Substation was deeded to the village 
and later to the fire department, which was operating at that time. 

1959, Railroad crossings at, Spruce and Cedar Streets were closed 
and Pine Street railroad crossing widened with signal lights installed 

1961, The village voted in favor of a public water system. A con- 
tract was given to Freeburg Construction Company, a tower was built, 
and water mains and meters were installed. Water was turned on offi- 
cially January 2, 1962. . 

1962, The Illinois Light and Power Company laid gas mains and in- 
stalled meters. October, 1962, natural gas was made available to all 
who requested it. , , o 

1963, April - Ivan and Robert Caulk installed a coin laundry in- 
their building adjoining their grocery store. 



SCENE ON IRVING MAIN STREET 
MANY YEARS AGO 

Left to right: Bert Cole, 
McKinney, Thomas Hefley, Mars 
Winn, Thomas Hunter , Howard Carr 
and at the end. Unknown. Seated 
front is Homer 0. Green. 





OLD IRVING DWELLING 

Probably one of the oldest hou 
ses in Irving, built in the early 
1800s is now the home of Mrs. Mary 
Rucker Padgett and is located on 
Spruce Streeto She was told many ye 
ars ago that the front room was us- 
ed as a voting place when Lincoln 
was elected President, the ballots 
being handed out the front window 
to voters. 

15 



COMPLIMENTS 
O F 


CHESTER E. EVANS 


Compliments of 


HOME OIL CO. 


MARATHON PRODUCTS 


Carl D. Brooks & son 


Compliments of 


McDavid Motor Car Co., Inc. 


NOKOMi S, ILLINOIS 


Your Ford Dealer Since |9I7 


Compliments of 


Hilltboro Saving 
& 


SMITH OIL GO. 


Loan Ast'n 


Alex Smith owner 




Major Gas for Less 


White & White 


2105 School St. 
Hillsboro, Illinois 




Phones KE 2-5010 



16 




CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST 

OF 

LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Heifer moved 
from Hillsboro to the Irving community 
in 1952. Being members of the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 
and since there was no organization of 
that church in Irving, Mrs. Helfer- 
held classes for the children in the 
home* 

In March, 56 the Heifers bought — 
the two story house located on the 
west side of the tracks owned by Mr. 
and Mrs. Stanley Everley. They moved- 
into this house and on July 15 of the 

same year Mrs. Heifer organized the "Home bunday bchool" with tne app- 
roval of the church authorities in Springfield with which the Irvi- 
ng area was associated. Lillian Hutchins, an eight year old neighbor 
was the only person present except for the Heifer family. A total of 
eight persons were in attendance the first Sunday. As time went on the 
attendence increased. 

In separating for classes they assembled around the kitchen table- 
and due to lack of teachers, Mrs. Hedfer taught two classes of thirty 
minutes each. 

Visiting Elders from western states who were serving two year 
missions without pay came now and then to assist with the services. 
In 1957 Elders Larry Mortensen and Garry Christians were placed in Irv 
ing by the president of Northern States Mission with headquarters in 
Chicago and they labored for six weeks in this community. 

Mrs. Helfer*s daughter, Darlene left early in 1957 when she and 
her husband moved to Ogden, Utah and Mrs. Heifer was left with no help' 
It became necessary for some of the children to come early for class- 
es. Later exercises were held after which they assembled for a closing 
song and prayer. Much time and money was spent to prepare for projects 
which must be used as a substitute for a teacher. 

In the early part of 1962 the Heifer family bought a home on the 
same street, leaving the old house to be used entirely for church pur- 
poses. 

Since August of 1962 seven missionaries have been sent to labor- 
in the Irving vicinity. Elder Bruce Ehlert and Elder David Pentelute 
organized a basketball team, youth club, the Mutual Improvement Ass — 
ociation and the primary association. 

The past few years, Irving has been changed from the Springfield 
branch to the Centralia branch of the church. In Apr., 1963 the Irving 
church was formed into a dependant branch with a membership of sixty. 

At the present time, the primary has an enrollment of twenty-nine 
children, there are five officers and thirty-four active members. 

Members are looking forward to some day replacing the old house- 



fith a new church. 



*•« 



Remember when Irving had three doctors at the same time? 



17 



JIM'S Style Shop 



Mens and boys clothing 
AND 
FURNISHINGS 

HILLSBORO, ILL. PHONE KE2-2525 



Settle (fS^afo 

Women's Ready-To-Wear 

Coats and Suits 

Sportswear 

HILLSBORO, ILL. 
Phone KE2-3626 214 S.Main 



RUHL 
BUICK CO 



PANA, ILL. 



2US. PHONE 5550 



P a^dd&ck'A 



THE PLACE TO 
BUY LUMBER 

READY MIX CONCRETE 
PHONE PHONE 

1230 1760 



BLAINE 



P I N K S T O N 



AUCTIONEER 

AND 

LIVE STOCK DEALHR 



MARFELL'S 
Insurance Aij«ncy 



INSURE TODAY 
BE SURE TOMORROW 



RAMSEY, ILLINOIS 



WITT, ILL. 



PHONE 2551 



RUSSELL M. MASTERS 



EXCAVATING 
BASEMENTS 
..'ATER LINES 
ELECTRIC 



TRUCKING 
SEPTIC TANKS 
SEWER LINES 
FOOTING'S 



ROCK-EARTH (Black t- Fill) 
t^HONK rVITT 4182 



\ \ , COMPLIf.ENTS 

RESIDENTIAL* ' COMMERCIAL 
MOTORS 
NEW & REBUILT MOTORS 
MOTOR REPAI RING 

( wiTT, iir. 



IRVING CHRISTIAN CHURCH 



19 



The Irving Christian Church was organized in 1853 with eighteen 
charter members. The congregation held meetings in the school house 
when it was available and in groves in the summer, and at times they 
were held in the homes of members. 

Some of the earlier ministers were Taulbee, Lynn, and Ward and 
they preached whenever a place could be found. In 1876 Rev. R.B. Gil- 
bert reorganized the congregation with twenty-one members. 

In 1878 a chapel was built, the lot being donated by Catherine 
Berry, mother of Milton Berry, that lot being the present site of the 
church. The services continued until 1885, when by death and removal 
of families to other places, services were discontinued. 

In 1893, W. H. Boles from Eureka Held a six weeks' meeting and 
reorganized the church with eighty-three members. Some of the families 
who came into the church at that time were W.C. Vandever, W.N. Taylor, 
Milton Berry, R. J. Cockelreas, Charles Cook, W.P. Mason, Joseph Mason, 
John Senior, W.T. Ault, C. A. Grantham, J. Vanhoosier and others. 

To accomodate a larger membership, a new church was built and- 
dedicated on June 13, 1920. The dedicatory services were conducted by 
H.H. Peters of Bloomington. Mrs. Maria Senior (80 years), grandmother 
of Mrs. Anna Canaday was the only charter member present. 

The building committee included C.A. Grantham, Milton Berry, Frank 
Turnbull, W. A. Vandever, and E. A. Lyerla. 

One of the ministers who served the church the longest was Rev. 
M. L. Easterling who now lives in Decatur although he and his wife 
maintain their home here. 

W. A, Vandever who left Irving when a young man, had always kept 
his membership in the Irving Christian Church and was an ardent supp- 
orter as were his brothers ana sisters. 

The church celebrated its centennial at an all day service on Sun 
day, September 13,1953, the pastor. Rev. M.L. Easterling preaching the 
sermon at the morning service and Mrs. Anna Canaday read the history 
of the church. 

The Rev. Paul Rhodes is the present pastor; trustees are Jacob 
Stokes, Howard Davis, Fred Lyerla; Elders are Ross McPherson, Jacob 
Stokes, Howard Davis, and Fred Lyerla (Em9ritus), and Sunday School Su 
perintendent is Ross McPherson. 




COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



HILLSBORO ILLINOIS 

RELIABLE SINCE 
1869 



[ontqomeri] Mews 



BEST WISHES 



Paris Frozen Foods 

Complete Locker Service 

Hillsboro, III. Phone KE 2-3822 

RICHARD HOPPER RUSSELL RHOADES 



trulockmachinery 



FAIR 



PHONE 1201 ASSUMPTION, ILLINOIS ROUTE 51 

FARM IMPLEMENTS INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY POWER EQUIPMENT 

^i^itox^ n/u^fcoms PARTS AND SERVICE ^^ 2^^/'-:'^" 



20 



IRVING FREE METHODIST CHURCH 



21 



The Irving Free Methodist church wae organized In December, 1880 
In the carpenter shop of Isaiah Grantham. Rev. William B. Colt was 
chairman and did the organizing. Members placed on first class roll 
were Washburn Smith (local preacher), Theodore Hefley (class leader), 
Ida King, Isabella Vandever, Sally Satterlee, Ambrose Smith, Leonard 
King, Lou Hefley, and Samuel King. 

First servl'ces were held in homes for about a year and the next 
winter. Rev. Colt and Rev. Robert Sanderson held a meeting in the car- 
penter shop. Rev. Thomas Marsh came the next fall as the first pastor 
and held a meeting in the Christian church. At this time Irving with 
Ohlman and Robert*8 chapel formed a circuit. 

In the fall of 1881 a church was partly built and the congregation 
worshipped all winter without it being plastered. The building was 
completed the following summer and dedicated by Rev. James Marsh. Trus- 
tees were Silas Kelly, William H. Edwards, C.H. Tiffin, John Bartlett, 
and William H. Nickey. 

The Irving and Hillsboro Free Methodist churches were made a cir- 
cuit in 1890 and remained as such until 1932. 

By 1926 the membership was so small that the District Elder, Rev. 
J. D. Williams advised closing the doors of the church and taking the 
membership to Hillsboro. Rev, Clara Roberts (now Mrs. J.G, Yeck) heard 
of this and offered to hold a meeting with no remuneration. In May a 
tent meeting was held in the park. Rev. Roberts preached and the ch- 
urch revived and took on new life. 

Aug. 22, 1932, the Irving society requested the annual conference 
to divide the Hillsboro-Irving circuit and the request was granted 
Rev. Clara Roberts served as pastor and continued until 1934 when the 
church was served by student pastors part of the time. 

The Masonic Hall which was originally the Cumberland Presbyterian 
church was bought by the Free Methodist church on Sept. 22, 1940, and 
in 1942 the Truitt property adjoining the church was purchased for a 
parsonage* 

A building fund was started in 1956 and the following year a com- 
mittee met with the District Superintendent, Rev. B.F, Hibbett to make 
plans for building a new church. By 1961 sufficient funds had been 
raised and subscribed. Under the pastorate of Rev. Claude Griffith, 
construction was begun and by July 10 the cornerstone was laid. 

Sunday afternoon, May 20, 1962, the dedication service was held 
with Bishop Marston bringing the message. Lewis Mose, president of the 
board of trustees presented the building for dedication. 

The present pastor of the Free Methodist church is Rev. David 
Dyer; bd. of trustees are Lewis Mose, Ray White, Frank Carriker, James 
Cranfill and Eustace Payme; stewards are Ruth Haley, Daisy Payne and 
Dorothy Meisenheimer ; Sunday school superintendent, James Cranfill i 
and class leader, Declecia White. 

FIRST SECOND 

PRESENT 




Of He • 

PHONE B^-K 





Residence 

FHONC aoo 


Compliments of 




A<muB, M^'tietf, 




REAL ESTATE BROKER 




Auc tioneer 





FARMS FOR SALE 



40K0MIS, ll-l_ 



ComplinMiits ef 




McDAVID MOTOR CAR CO., Inc. 



^t^afc^ 



KEIIogg 2-3921 Corner of Wood & Berry Streets 

HIILSBORO, ILLINOIS 



Best Wishes 



NOKOMIS IMPLEMENT CO. 

122 South Spruce Street 

Nokomis, Illinois 

McCORMICK TRACTORS AND MACHINES • INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS 



GEORGE PR I DOLE 
OWNER 



PHONE; 85 



22 



IRVING METHODIST CHURCH 



23 



Many dates and facts concerning the early Methodist church history 
have faded from the memory of the old inhabitants. Services were held 
in groves, homes and barns for all denominations and the first church 
was the Hopewell Methodist church which was organized by the Reverends 
Benson and Bastion, itinerant preachers in 1829. John Grantham, Sr. 
was the first local preacher. The first edifice erected in 1830 where 
they worshipped until 1849, when they built and moved to a new bldg., 
one and a half miles north of Irving. In 1855 this building was moved 
to the town on the site of the present Methodist church. In 1858 it 
was moved away and a new church was built, being dedicated in 1859. 

The Epworth League was organized 1890, the Junior Epworth League 
in 1894, cradle roll in 1902 and Missionary society in 1905. In 1910, at 
an Epworth League meeting, it was decided to build a new church and 
Lizzie Grantham gave the first five dollars toward the building fund. 
The old church was torn down and the present church was built. A very 
inspiring dedication service was held, Feb. 26, 1911, by the District 
Supt., B.F, Shipp, D.D. and the church Pastor, Rev. E.O. Clark. Funds 
were raised to clear all indebtedness. 

In 1917 the Live Wire class of the Sunday School was organized 
and is still active. The Helping Hand class was organized in 1921 and 
was active until one by one each member passed away. The Hy Shy My 
class was organized in 1928 and is still very active. 

In 29 the church celebrated its Centennial with all day services. 
The Pastor was Rev. J. W. Williams and Rev. A. M. Wells delivered the 
morning sermon. This organization was called the Methodist Episcopal 
church until 39 when the Methodist Episcopal church, Methodist church 
South and Protestant churches were united into one Methodist church. 
The Women's society of Christian service was organized in September 8, 
1940, taking the place of the Ladies Aid which had been in existence 
since 1899. 

There have been many improvements through the years. In 1870 
the first organ was placed in the church, in 1899 a new organ was pur- 
chased, in 1921 the Live Wire Class bought the first piano, in 1958- 
a Hammond electric organ was purchased and later a new piano. In 1962 
much work was accomplished with more planned for 1963. 

Many ministers have served the church and two have died while 
serving, the Rev. E. E. Shult in 1931 and Rev. Lester Earp in 1961. 
The membership is now 144 and many others attend services and help in 
the work. 

The Rev. David Lofdahl is the present pastor, Lynn Eddington is 
president of the official board and Mrs. Walter Sturgeon is Sunday 
School Superintendent. 

Present 
Past 




COMPLIMINTS OF 



TAYSTEE BREAD 



COMPANY, 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



PET MILK CO. 



Nokomis, llllnels 



CHEVROUET 



BUICK 



USED CARS & TRUCKS 



Traitt & Co., Inc. 



HILLSBORO. ILLINOIS 



PHONE KE2 5222 



HILLTOP BAKERY 

Hillsboro, Illinois 



PIES 
ROLLS CAKF.S 

DONUTS 
COOKIES BREAD 

317 S. MAIN PHONE KE2 2334 



Best Wishes 



PANA 
LUMBER CO. 

"Everjtlilng From 

Dasement To Chimney Top" 

Phone 1140 Pana, aUnols 



24 



FORMER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



The Irving Cumberland Presbyterian church was org 
under the leadership of Joel Knight. In 1866 the cong 
brick church on the site of the present Free Methodist 
W. J. McDavid was instrumental in building up the con 
1903 a new church was planned. 

The building committee included John T. McDavid 
Knight, H, M. Kelly, Abner Moore, Dr. W.V. Parkhill, A 
C, B, McKinney. While the building was being erected, 
were held in the Kelly and Winn Hall. The church was 
southeast of the Lutheran church on Pine St., the cost 
and contents being $6300, all of which was paid before 
January 1, 1905. The church seated four hundred people 
with a gasoline lighting system. 

The first minister was Rev. D.W. Cheek and among 
ing were W.J. McDavid, W.K.Gibson, J.M.Newman, A.J.Tayl 
er and J. C. Lowe. 

Shortly after the new church was dedicated, the 
was dropped and it became the Presbyterian church. 

Later, the house now owned and occupied by Mr. a 
Wells was built for the Presbyterian Manse. 

The church burned in 1923 and the congregation de 
building but to join or affiliate with other Irving ch 



anized in 1830 — 

regation built-a 

Church. The Rev, 

gregation and in 

, Sr. , John E .- 
,K. Vandever and 
church services 
built one block- 
of the building 
the dedication, 
and was lighted 

ministers follow 
or, W.L. McWhert- 

name Cumberland- 

nd Mrs. Glenn E. 

cided against re- 
urches . 




Remember when the apple drying house stood two blocks eaSt 
of the Methodist church and was built and burned three times? 



Remember when Irving had two local trains each day? 



25 



^^K(^%CI,tul€iti(^H^ f 


^fte ^ct^t 


ku9td%cd ^eet^<t €i%e tfic ka%dcd.t 


We extend our best wishes on the occasion o 


f Irving 's Centennial 


Anniversary. We hope the adage, "The first one hundred years 


are the hardest" holds true and that the \ 


sest of everything is 


yet to come to the Village of Irving. 




ILLINOIS POWER COMPANY 


^fi^ 




M&M HAMP 


FARM 


MAT & MILDRED WEML 


1 N G E R 


■ YOUR PUREBRED--ME 


AT TYPE- 


HAMPSHIRE 




HOg Br e ed er 




BOARS AND GILTS 
FOR SALE 


IRVING, ILL. 


Quality and Satisfaction 


Guaranteed 



26 



IRVING EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH 



27 



There had been a flourishing Lutheran congregation as far back as 
1842 when Daniel Trimper, a Lutheran minister established a church 
known as St. John's Evangelical Lutheran church. It was located north 
west of Irving. 

In 1858 a number of people of Lutheran faith decided to organize 
and a church was built in the village. The constitution was signed 
August 21, 1858, by Isaac Short, Pastor William A. Newcomb, George- 
File and W.M. Neisler.There were twelve charter members and in a short- 
time the membership increased to forty-five. 

March 29, 1863 the second pastor, Rev. John B, Cromer, an ordained 
minister from Indiana became the pastor of the church. 

Many pastors served the Irving Lutheran church during the next- 
forty-five years and the congregation continued to grow. 

December 26, 1908 a congregational meeting was held at the church 
and a decision was made to erect a new church on the same site. A build 
ing committee was appointed and were Rev. E.E. Campbell, Julius Carr- 
iker, William H. File, and James Drew. 

The new church was completed in 1909 at a cost of $7600.00. It was 
dedicated February 20, 1910, with Dr. Yarger, Field Secretary of the 
General Synod as speaker. 

In 1912 the first church parsonage was sold to Mrs. H. Price and 
the following year the present parsonage was built at a cost of $3200. 
At the time the parsonage was built Rev. George Parker was pastor. 

The eightieth anniversary of the Irving Evangelical Lutheran- 
church was celebrated September 11, 1938, during the pastorate of Rev. 
Arthur E, Schmidt. 

The one hundredth anniversary of the church was celebrated Sept- 
ember 21, 1958, during the pastorate of the Rev. Jens Larson. 

The Irving Lutheran church has at different times been connected 
with other Lutheran charges in the surrounding area, the same pastor 
serving both congregations. 

The Rev. Jens Larsen of Hillsboro who retired from the ministry- 
several years ago is now acting as supply pastor for the Irving congre 
gation. 



FIRST 



PRESENT 




Ma.K<x% Mad 

4A4 AfPKOVtD 

AIR CONDITIONED HOT WATER HEAT 

Individually Room Controlled 

fFJW^ KE 2-2677 

Route 127 South "^i'' Shower nnd Tub 

Spring - Air Mattresses 



Compliments of 



EXCAVATING- TRUCKING - READY MIX 

KE 2-2422 

BERNARD LESSMAN HiUsboro, Illinois 

CLARENCE C. SEYBERT 



Congratulations 

PONTO S TAVERN 

Witt's newest, smartest bar 



Air Conditioned Comfort 

Phone 2581 WITT, ILLINOIS 



L IVESTOCK 
SEE 



VARNER WHITE 

Top Prices Paid 

i COWS CALVES HOGS ^^^L KE2-.':'325 



28 



MAIN STREET BUILDINGS 

The building at the left was built by VK.E. Moiain and used for a 
real estate and insurance office until he moved to Hillsboro. Clinton 
Cockelreas operated the "Town Tavern" there until his death, and for a 
short time it was operated by John Dal Canton. The building was sold 
to W,V. Berry who used it as an insurance office and supervisor's offi 
ce until he retired, also used for village and township boards meet- 
ing and polling place for precinct one. 

. Next is the Barber Shop operated by Everett Spindel who bought it 
in 1960, It was built by E. P. Carriker who with several of his sons 
operated it many years. Several years, Charlotte Morehead's Beauty- 
was in the rear. Several others operated barber shops after Mr. — 
Carriker retired and his son, Charlie moved to California. 

Kelly Mercantile Company has been operated by Foster and Edna 
Kelly in the next building (Owned by W. V. Berry) since January, 1952, 
after burning out in the corner building, September, 1951. Mr. Kelly 
started in business with his father, R. L. Kelly in November 1916 in 
the old Kelly Brothers' location, now a vacant lot west of Montgomery 
County Vault Service. He bought the Donavan Drug Store and building in 
1929 and in 1931 the two stocks were combined in the drug store build- 
ing. R.L. Kelly retired in 1936 and in 1938 the grocery stock was sold 
to L.R. Hammond. Mr. Kelly bought the remaining stock of Fowler Hdwre. 
Company, combining it with Kelly Mercantile Company. In November, 1963 
Mr. Kelly will have completed forty-seven years of store management in 
Irving and his slogan now is: "Planning to hang on until I'm 65." 

Rice's Cafe was remodeled in 1956 by the Wesley Edwards family. 
Two buildings which were combined formerly housed several shoe repair 
shops and grocery stores. The Edwards family operated the cafe three 
years and the Forrest Snow family for one year before the business was 
bought by Mr. and Mrs. Rice in 1961 and is still operated by them. 



KllLY MfRCAJITIlKO 





Hilv wm 



.il%'*""'*' 




Remember when we could walk all the way to the cemetery on a 
concrete walk and did? 




29 



HOME LOANS INSURED SAVINGS 
NOKOMIS SAVINGS &LOAN ASSN. 

"Where you save 

DOES make a difference" 
104 State Phone 35 Nokomis 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

DR. B. T. ROSE 

OPTOMETRIST 



NOKOMIS. ILL. 



Compliments 
of 



NOKOMIS 

DAIRY QUEEN 

With the country fresh flavor 



Compliments 
of 

P N HIRSH & CO. 

Clothing 8 Shoes 



Nokomis 



111. 



Phone 424 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

LOSKOT'S MOTOR SALES 
USED CARS & AUTO PARTS 
ALSO SALVAGE 



HARRY W. LOSKOT 



IRVING, ILL. 



Compliments 
of 

MART'S TOT-N-TEEN SHOP 
Largest selection of childrens 

wear in central 111* 
Nokomis 111. 



Compliments 
of 
BELL'S JEWELRY 

Brides Registry 



Nokomis 



111. 



SCHAEFER'S STYLE SHOP 

Bobby Brooks Nelly Don 

Jerrie Lurie 
Nokomis 111. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

Candy Kitchen 



CANDY 
Nokomis 



ICE CREAM 
111. 



Compliments 

of 

THE S ALE SUPERETTE 

A G Food Market 
Nokomis 111. 



Compliments 

KEELED 

Quality Cleaners and T. V. 
Nokomis 111' 



MODE 0* DAY 
FROCK SHOP 
Lingerie Dresses Sports Wear 

Hosiery & Jewelry 
421 N. State Litchfield 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
CAPRI IGA FOODLINER 
FINEST QUALITY IN GROCERIES 

MEATS AND FROZEN FOOD 
OPEN 8 AM TO 9 PM DAILY 
HILLSBORO, ILL. 



Compliments 
of 

Woodmen Accident 

and Life Company 

James H. Vancil 
Nokomis 111. Phone 491 



Wilma and Bob's Dairy Queen 

ROUTE 127 SOUTH HILLSBORO 



30 



IRVING POST OFFICE 



31 



On record in the National Archives, s post office was established 
at Irving on July 9, 1856 at which time William Wiley was postmaster- 
and occupied a building near the present site of the fire house. 

In 1861, Hiram Huestis followed by James Berry in 1873 occupied 
buildings in the same area. John Knight moved into the brick building 
west of the old hotel in 1878 and remained until John Cottle became 

postmaster in 1881, followed by Rachel Cottle in 1884. At that 

time the post office was moved to a frame building between the corner 
and hotel building. ^ ,^ ^ ^u 

Then in 1885 the post office was moved over on the site of the 
present highway. Route 16 by George Rarer, postmaster. Again, Rachel 
Cottle became post master in 1889, serving until William Williams was 
appointed in 1893 and moved to the present Arr.erican Legion Hall site. 

Abner Moore took office in 1898 and moved to the location which 
is now Rice's Cafe. He was followed by Wm. Berry who took office in 
1900 and served in quarters joining the present post office building. 

In 1915 Walter Berry became postmaster and served in the building 
that is now Kelly Mercantile Store. 

William A, Cook became postmaster in 1935, when he purchased and 
moved to what is now known as the old post office building. He serv- 
ed until his death in 1952. 

This vacancy was filled by Charley Funk until the appointment of 
George Bryce in 1955. The post office building at this time was owned- 
by Arline Cook, widow of William A. Cook and leased to the Post Office 
Department. 

In 1960, under a commercial leasing plan, Harold Jurgena erected 
a new building to meet specifications set up by the Department. The 
building is at the site of the former Kelly Mercantile Store which 
burned several years ago. On October 22, 1960, the new building with 
nearly twelve hundred feet floor space was dedicated and occupied by 
the post office, the first time in the history of Irving that the post 
office had located in a building erected especially for this purpose. 

Knowing well the hardships of mud roads, horses. Model T Fords and 
long hours is Walter Neisler, now retired after forty-three years of 
service. Another retired carrier still living in this community is 
Walter Satterlee who recalls leading the horses with sacks of mail 
around the route, due to muddy roads. 

Other rural mail carriers of the earlier days are names to be re- 
called such as William H. Haller, Roy Lipe and Willis Tester, all de- 
ceased. 

The present carrier serving the Irving community, Ross D. Perkins 
has also experienced the horse and wagon days but modern conveniences 
and good roads make the job easier and he now serves sixty-two miles 
in the Irving community. 



PRESENT 



FORMER 




WOODRUFF'S TAVERN 

Courthouse Square 

HILLSBORO PHONF. KE2-3404 


GERWOLLS CAFE 
Dinners 
Short orders 

HILLSBORO ILLINOIS 
OTTO & MARGARET GERWOLLS 


WALKERS 

5c To $1 Store 

Shop Here and Save 

— >l/ways f/ie Best for Less — 
Hillsboro, Illinois 


TOWX 
SHOP 

HALMARK CARDS 
IMPORTS GIFTS 
J. BORGOGNONI 


Swingle 

Jewelers 

HILLSBORO, ILL. 

DIAMOK'D HEADQUARTERS 

Complete Line Of Watches 
LONGINE WITTNAUER 
BULOVA P. LGIM ELGIN 

GIFTS ?■"? -ai CGCASIGNS 


PROFESSIONAL 

DRY GLEANING 

228 N. MAIN HILLSBORO 


THE 

HILLSBORO 

JOURNAL 

Montgomery County's Most 
Widely Read Newspaper 


CARTER CINDERELLA 
POLLYFLINDER HEALTH TEX 

INFANTS & CHILDRENS WEAR 
HILLSBORO ILLINOIS 



32 



IRVING GROCERY AND COIN LAUNDRY 



33 



On 
grocery 
who have 
Masonic 

The 
floor fo 
Hammond 
Lorts al 

The 
who inst 
G. E, Wa 
as the B 
location 
and othe 



the fi 
and mea 

been 
Lodge. 

buildi 
r his 
operate 
so oper 

second 
ailed a 
shers a 
otkin R 

includ 
rs. 



rst floor of the two story building at the left is a- 
t market owned and operated by Ivan and Robert Caulk, 
in business since 1946. The upper story belongs to the 

ng was built by F. P. Cockelreas who used the first 
general store and rented the hall above. Later, L.R, 
d a grocery and meat market until 1945 and William 
ated the store for a short time, 
two story building is owned by Ivan and Robert Caulk 
coin laundry in April, 1963. There are ten (12 pound) 
nd four dryers. Most people will remember the location 
estaurant, although others who had restaurants in this 
ed Willia.-n Meyers, Valle Funk, C.L. Funk, Robert Funk 



a 


^ 




■^ m \ ,1^ 


ppaissii*f«si^ 




r^ 


^l^^^^l^lPMil^?!!5 



ELAINE 



BEAUTY COIFFURE 



TOWN TAVERN 



The first building houses Elaine's Beauty Coiffure opened April 
15 by Elaine House. The building is owned by James "Felix" Dalzotto 
and was formerly the Klimek Variety Store. 

The Town Tavern owned and operated by Mr. Dalzotto occupies the 
two buildings at the right. John DalCanton started the tavern at this 
location in 1949 and after his retirement, it was operated by Mr. and 
Mrs. Harold Singler for two years. The past seven years, the business 
has been owned and operated by Mr. Dalzotto. 




COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

COFFMAN DRUG STORE 
The Rexall Store 

303 North State Street 
LITCHFIELD, ILLINOIS 

Phone: 524-^255 

Lloyd E. Ceffman 
Wayne P. Brauer 
Pharmacists 



LUMBER CO. 

NOKOMIS WITT 

LUMBER BUILDING MATERIAL 
POLE BUILDINGS A SPECIALTY 



BEST WISHES 



YleuiEenAi|4> 



LITCHFIELDTS NEWEST AND MOST 
MODERN DEPARTMENT STORE 
PHONE 324-4420 
415-17 N. STATE LITCHFIELD 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

HOLMER'S 

Progressive Food 

MARKET 

Fresh cut meats our specialty 

PHONE 324-2002 
413 N. STATE LITCHFIELD 



LIVE BETTER FOR LESS 

AT YOUR FRIENDLY KROGER 

STORE AT NOKOMIS ILL. 



CONGRATULATIONS 




VICTOR MICKLAUTZ MGR , 



yv<*mpfo/r 



Rexall 
DRUG STORE 

J. E. KAMM R. Ph, 



NOKOMIS 



ILL. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

S C H N E I DE R'S 

& 

FILLMORE 

FROZEN FOODS 

FOOD PROCESSING 
FROZEN FOODS LOCKER SERVICE 

JOHN SCHNEIDER Prop. 
NOKOMIS ILL. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



NOKOMIS EQUin ELEVATOR CO. 



BULK DELIVERY SERVICE 

OF 

FEEDS AND FERTILIZER 

GRINDING & MIXING FEEDS 

CORN-BANK & GRAIN STORAGE 

NOKOK 



34 



NEISLER FEED AND GRAIN COMPANY 



35 



Drexel Neisler bought the Irving Grain Company business from Frank 
Ware and Macon Toberman in 44 ^nd changed the name to Neisler Feed and 
Grain Company. In 1958, Mr. Neisler- s son-in-la.v, Bradley Caulk went 
into partnership with him. Besides selling feed and grain, they de- 
al in a trucking service. 

Pictured left, a corn drier, the office with elevator above and 
attached to the right, the grinding and mixing room. Far right is the 
fertilizer storage building. 




C.L. FUNK MARATHON SERVICE STATION 

The building was erected around forty years ago by Charles McHugh 
who operated a shell Service Station until March 1, 1933 when he sold 
the business to William K. Hamilton. October 1, 1955 C.L, Funk bought 
out Mr. Hamilton and continued with Shell Service until a short ti^ie 
ago when he changed to Marathon. 



EVERLEY MACHINE SHOP 



Stanley Everley opened a garage in 1942 in the L. H. Cockelreas 
building. In 1947, he built a concrete block building on the east side 
of Main Street, Where he continued 
mechanical work on cars until 1953. 

At this time, he installed-- 
a complete set of modern radiator 
repairing equipment and now oper- 
ates a machine shop. 




HAP 

& 

MARY ANN 

T A V E R N 

NOKOMIS- ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

WITT DRY GOODS 
STORE 

M.H.Rehner Manager 

PRICES LOW MAKES 
WITT DRY GOODS GROW 

It cost so little to 
look your best. 



& 

Motel 



BEST WISHES 



JLcitUtU 



NO'^HMIS 



ILLINOIS 



SEAMSTRESS 



PHONE 
KE3-4380 



ALTERATIONS 



IRVING 
ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



Vt^uc^U^ ^ 



(^9t 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 



USED CARS TRUCKS 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL 



WILLIAM KE 3-4304 

HAROLD ■ KE 3-4450 



'6/ 

'^ CAFE 



ART fi. BERNADINE 
A Good Place To Eat 



DAY Ph. KE 2-2531 
NIGHT Ph. KE 2-2269 



Compliments of 



KENNY'S MARATHON SERVICE 

24 - HOUR EMERGENCY PHONE 
TIRES - TUBES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 



Sctt^ 



ei 4 



1132VANDALIARD. 



HILLSBORO, ILLINOIS 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



36 



SCHOE^EWEIS GARAGE 



37 



Hardy Schoeneweis started in the garage business in 1922 when he 
ivas employed by Ivan Lingle. 

In 1927 he went into business for himself in the former Christian 
ch-jrch building which hod b'^en moved across the street from the Lingle 
garage. 

He continued in the garage business in various locations includ- 
ing Route 16 Garage and the Lingle building. 

In 1955 Mr. Schoeneweis built a new modern garage at the site of 
the former Cockelreas Livery Stable and he is still in business there. 




CAULK BROTHER TRUCKING SERVICE 



Kenneth Caulk is pictured standing by one of the trucks owned and 
operated by him and his brother Lamar Caulk. The building was the for- 
mer Kelly packing house and was purchased by the brothers in 1958. They 
have been in the trucking business since 1941 and for a time another- 

brother, Lynn Caulk was associated with them. Other buildings 

where the Caulks operated were the service station on the Douglas used 
car lot end the former Chal Groner building on the corner of Main and 
Pine Streets. i 



CANNING FACTORY IN THE 1920s 

The former canning factory building was built in 1920 by 
of twenty farmers and it was in operation for around five yea 
Brookman and Frank Rhinehart were managers and there were four 
about ten women employed to prepare and can tomatoes, beans 
corn. Shipn.entc were made to Alton 
and there were also local sales. F. 
R. Baker recalls that he and John- 
Schraudt helped in laying the conc- 
rete blocks and at that time Mr. Ba 
ker was Vice President of the organ 
ization. The building is now owned 
by Neisler Feed and Grain Company 
and houses tne large trucks operat- 
ed by the company. 



a group- 

rs. E.O, 

men and 

and som«> 




COMPLIMENTS OF 



(^€L%i^ttc d ^ea^ccf^S^a/t 



RAYMOND, ILL. PHONE 1123 



CempllnMnta of 

THE 
HRST NATIONAL BANK 

Of Raymond 



Membar F. D. I. C 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



ORLADINI BROS. 

STAG BEER 



TOVEY, ILL, 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



GRABBE 
IMPLEMENT CO. 

NOKOMIS ILL. PHONE 142 

/ . 



VERNA GRABBE 
ALENE GRABBE 
SHARON GRABBE 



OWNERS ZD- 1 PHILIP GRABBE 

SALLY GRABBE 
VERN R. GRABBE 



38 



BUSINESSES ON PINE STREET 

To the far left is shown a part of the Township building which 
houses equipment for road work. Melvin "Pappy" Stokes is the present 
highway cor.imissioner for the township and is starting his third term. 

The next three buildings house Montgomery County Vault Service. 
The first two were purchased from Titsworth and Hefley on February 1, 
1951 by Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Handle. Mr. Randle died November 1, 1957 
and Mrs. Randle continued with the business. These buildings were used 
for making and storing vaults until 1961, when shebought the main 
building to the right, which is used for an office with vault manufact 
uring and storage in the rear. 

Mrs. Randle remarried and she and her husband, Allen Edwards oper 
ate a flourishing business, servicing Bond, Macoupin and Montgomery 
Counties. There are three trucks in operation. 




THE TELEPHONE 



firs 
gome 
offi 
home 
11 b 
were 
dire 

were 
Flor 
were 

Cons 
alle 



The 
t Irv 
ry Co 
ce wa 

and 
uildi 

a Mr 
ctors 

The 

Mary 
a Les 

Bell 

In 1 
ol ida 
d. Th 



Peop 
ing 
unty 
s la 
offi 
ng a 
. Ba 

wer 
firs 

Rue 
sman 
e an 
93 
ted 
e pr 



les 

Offi 
Vau 
ter 
ce a 
t th 
rnar 
e Ne 
t Ir 
ker , 
, E 
d Lu 
the 

Tel 
esen 



Mutual Teleph 
ce was in one 
It Service . 

moved into t 
nd in 1913 th 
e site of the 
d. Cade Hamli 
al McLean, A. 
ving telephon 
Susie Staff 
sther Schraud 
cile Carriker 
Mutual Teleph 
ephone Compan 
t new buildin 



one Company was organi 

of the buildings now 
It was then owned by A 
he front room of the 
e telephone office v/as 
present office. At th 
n, Paul Zimme-man and 
K. Vandever and Willia 
e operator was Bertha 
ord, Mabel Stafford, 
t, and Ruth Toberman, 
, and Dora Draper. 
one Company was taken 
y and in 1940 the di 
g was completed in Dec 



zed in 1902 and the 

owned by the Mont- 

.K. Vandever. The- 

Dr. P.J. Fuller ton 
moved into a sma- 

at time, managers- 
'.'«' alter McLean and 

m Mora in. 

2oTror. Following 
Fhilena Borror, 
Night operators- 
over by the 111. 

al syttem was inst 

emher , 1 955 . 



Remember when Irving had a weekly newspaper, a barrel factory, 
two blacksmith shops, a photograph gallery (Dan Kelly), and crcancry? 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Phone KEIlogg 2-2322 

^ Whitley Motors 

PONTliC - ff/tA(8lf« - MR/C 
413 South Hamillon Sireel Hillsboro. Illinois 

□ BOB PEEL QTINYJOHNSDN Q R.G.WHITLEY 




BANK 



Compliments of 



DUNN'S 

106 EAST WOOD STREET 

HILLSBORO, ILLINOIS 

Phone KEIlogg 2-3288 

Dependab/e Insurance 



J I M 



Compliments of 



G. R. KEITH 

Gas Engines 

Box 224 

Phone KEIlogg 2-3011 

Hillsboro, Illinois 



BEST WISHES 

BARAN & SON SERVICE 

Groceries - Package Liquor Gas 



ED BARAN & SON BILL 



Taylor Springs, 111. 



Compliments of 



Dr Pepper 

BOTTLING CO. 
Hillsboro. Illinois 



SEARS, ROEBUCK <z>v^ CD. 

RETAII. BTOREEI 

WE TOO ARE PROUD OF YOUR 100 YEARS. 
CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO 

YOUR CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 

SEARS ROEBUCK AND CO. p^^one KE 22961 
HILLSBORO, ILLINOIS 



Comoliments or 



Moonlight "Y' 



fRED&DOMINIC BARBETTI 



Compliments of 

EVERLEY 

Radiator and Machine Shop 
Complete Radiator Service — Industrial Machine Worit 

Stanley Everley, Prop. 



Irving, Illinois 



Phone KE 3-4414 



40 



DOUGLAS USED CAR OFFICE AND LOT 



41 



The Douglas and son used car lot and office, located where the 
old Leon Place once stood, was built by Logan Hammond in 1930. Alan 
Hodgkinson operated a service station here for nine years. Since 
1939 other operators include Elvert Skinner, Caulk Brothers, Allen 
Edwards and Dick Bailey. Ray White's Saw Shop was here for several 
years. 




DOUGLAS WORK SHOP AND PARTS STORE 

Douglas and son recently moved to this location after being in the 
car wrecking and repair business for nearly twenty years. The building 
has housed hardware stores of Latham and Ludewick, Ludewick and Lingle 
Grantham and Auble, Davies and Auble, and Bartlett, besides restau- 
rants, pool halls, garages and storage. 



IRVING FIRE TRUCK AND STATION 



Irving Volunteer Fire Depart- 
ment was organized in 1954. Present 
officers are Lamar Caulk, President 
and Robert Caulk, Secretary-Treas — 
urer. The building was the former- 
sub-station of Illinois Power and 
Light company, who deeded it to the 
village. They in turn deeded it to 
the Volunteer Fire Department. 





COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



LITCHFIELD CREAMERY CO. 



LITCHFIELD 



ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



DR. JOHN LABANC 

Dentist 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



Super I.G.A. Market 

QUALITY MEATS & GROCEVJES 
RAYMOND} ILL. PHONi. 1216 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



/fjXi'^ 



KE2 2202 
919 S. MAIN 



HILLSBORO 
ILLINOIS 



MERCANTILE CO 



FOSTER & EDNA KELLY 
IRVING ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



Ronchetti Distributing Co. 

Distributors of 
Budweiser - Busch Bavarian 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



BENNING EQUIPMENT COMPANY 
C AS E Implements 



NOKOMIS 



ILLINOIS 



PAUL R. BENNING 
PHONE 12 76 



RAYMOND 
ILLINOIS 



ALL-STAR 



Dairy products 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



HERMAN BRUNS 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

A N D R U S 



CLOTHING STORE 

Ready To wear 
OSH-KOSH AND KEY WORK CLOTHES 

HAROLD AND RACHEL 
CALL 2351 WITT, ILL. 



42 



REST HAVEN INCORPCRATED 



43 




. t;u r ui. lie a o • 

Mrs. John Bottomley, Noko 

entered the Home July 10, 1949 

entered each day until all beds 



tered the Home July lu, ly 
itered each day until all be 

In 1950 three rooms wer-B 
built by the Rev, Easterling. 

Rev. and Mrs. Lon Sefton 
arc the present owners. They h 
bathroom and utility room. 

The home is now incorporat 

Each Sunday morning a re 
patients and Rev. Sefton and 
these services. 

Many ministers, priests, 
izations as v.-ell as individual 
food, reading material and ot 
patients who always appreciate 

-TV- 4. ^ A. ^ t r 5„,.l,,J„r 



ling, a nurse realized the need for a 
ssarily needed hospital care, yet were- 
es. To meet this need, she and Rev East 
ilding a home for this purpose. A. Build 
ork being done by the Rev. Easterling, 
tian church. 

st facility of its kind in the County, 
invited to a dedication service on July 
astor of the Hillsboro Christian Church 
heme was named Rest Haven Convalescent 

and Mrs. Easterling, Edith Grantham, 

Ruth Host Martin, Blanche King Witter, 

in, Judith Gates, Nellie Golden, and- 

mis and Mrs. Marvin Weller, Hillsboro 
, and were the first patients. Others 

were taken, 
dded, including a sunroom, these being 

purchased the Home in June, 1956, and 
ave added ^ rooms for patients, a hall, 

ed and has a capacity for thirty bed-j. 
ligious service is conducted for the- 
sometimes guest ministers officiate at 

church groups, clubs and other organ — 
s call on patients, bringing gifts of 
her useful items. They visit with the 
any attention shown them. 
Rev. and Mrs. Sefton, Catherine Ham- 
Sara Durand, Harriet Hughes, bernice 
Hughes Uhlry, V/ilma Barker, Mary Hart- 
ness, Grace Logsdon, Ida Hartman, Janet 
Hartline. 



MI-EDD SHELTER CARE HOtJE 

Mrs. Minnie Eddington for many- 
years has opened her home to elder- 
ly people who were not bedfast. In 
1961 she received a license for the 
MI-EDD Shelter Care Home, it being 
the first of its kind in Montgomery 
County. There are thirteen aged peo 
pie who live in the Home. 

Mrs. Eddington is assisted by 
Rena Bauer and Doris Taylor. 



* 




IRVING SCHOOLS 



44 



Early records state that the first Irving township school was 
in the southwest corner in 1829 and was taught by Mr. Mclntire, age 70- 
Subscription schools were taught in deserted log cabins for $1.50 to 
$2.00 per pupil for a term of three months. The school day was usually 
ten hours long and the New Testament often served as the Reader. 

Some of the early teachers included John Christian, Robert Frank- 
lin, James Jenkins and the latter*s sister who taught a school in the 
Hopewell church. Wesley King taught a sixty day school in 1837 for 
$36.00 for the entire term. 

In 1847 the first frame school was built and was later moved into 
the village to a site across the road from the present school. A Mr. 
Frink was the first teacher. Other teachers at this "little school" 
were Nancy Hanks, Lottie Vandever and Miss Ault. The brick school ac- 
ross the road was used for the upper grades. 

Lottie Vandever taught forty-five years in the Irving school and 
she and Effie Cromer were first Irving High School graduates, class 
of lB89o E. Tackaberry was principal at that time. Mary Carriker Lipe 
was a member of the class of 1894 and the oldest Alumnus. C. White- 
church was principal. 

During the latter part of 1904 and early 1905, school was closed 
for a number of weeks because of a smallpox epidemic. Many were ser- 
iously ill and there were two deaths. 

In the spring of 1906 the school building was razed and the first 
brick building was completed that fall. In January, 1925 this building 
burned and was replaced by the present building. 

The Irving Parent-Teacher Association was organized about 1930. 
They sponsored the first Hot Lunch program, serving lunches for five 
cents each. Mrs. Gertrude Lindsey is the present cook and lunches are 
nov/ tv/enty-five cents. 

The present P.T.A. officers are James White, pres.; Mrs. Harold 
Byers, vice-pres.; Mrs. Walter Heifer, secretary; and Harry Wallace, 
treasurer . 

Irving High School was discontinued in 1948 and in 54, the Irving 
school became a part of the Hillsboro Community Unit, District three. 
Since 1956 the seventh and eighth grades have attended school in Hills- 
boro. 

The present enrollment is sixty-nine, teachers are Earl Roe (Prin- 
cipal), Everett Lewey, Dorothy Me isenheimer , and Betty Ehmann. J.T. 
McNew is janitor. 

Ava Lyerla Wells taught in the High School longer than any other 
teacher and Ina File Botkin wasthe first principal of the six grades. 



PKpqrwT TRVTNG SCIGGL 



c;prnMn qnHOOI, WHTCH ripmco 




FIRST HOT LUNCH STAFF, IRVING SCHOOL 



A5 



The kitchen staff for the first hot lunch program was started 
February 22, 1940. Pictured at work are Hazel Sost, Edith Grantham- 
Kenneth Furness, Grace Calhoun, and Rena Grill. 





FIRST BRICK SCHOOL 



Renenber when a gr'.up '.vas suspended fror. school 
and sneaked the horse drawn dray to get their books? 



May we at BLACKWELDERS 
Congratulate you on your 100th 
anniversary 






COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



Home ol Oie 
5% Cash Discount 



LITCHFIELD 



ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



;.>^ 



t'A 



UNCLE MOTOR CO. 

YOUR DODGE DEALER SINCE 1912 
HILLSBORO ILL. KE2 3242 



Compliments of 



^^^ BARBER 

SHOP 

EVERETT SPINDEL IRVING, ILL. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



NATHANSONS 

Clothing Store 



THE STORE FOR ^-1ENS & BOYS 

CLOTHING AND SHOES 

118 N. STATE ST. LITCHFIELD 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



Blaeuer Office Equipment Co. 

Every thing for the office 
213 N. STATE ST. LITCHFIELD 




Pfolsgrofs' 

Jewelry 



The Place To Oi For 
Brands You Know! 



218 N. State 



BEST WISHES 



SIDNEY'S 



WOMENS WEAR 



TOTS & TEENS 



ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 
LITCHFIELD ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



JAMES CATTINARI 



SCHLITZ 
NOKOMIS 



BLATZ 
ILLINOIS 



46 



AI4ERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY 



47 



Moncravie Unit 425 of the American Legion Zuxiliary was organized- 
in 1931 with 30 charter members. The first president was Nina Meyers 
and the 1963 president is Wilma Miles. 

The organization carries on a work among veterans, hospitals and 
orphanages that is nation wide. Each year Moncravie Unit makes cash- 
donations to the nine-point program which includes supplying cigarette 
and creature comforts to hospitalized veterans, Insulin and Vaponef - 
rin Funds, Canteen books which put a dollar into the pocket of a vete- 
ran who otherwise has no spending money, Christmas gift shops, where 
disabled veterans may select free gifts for their families, Easter gi- 
fts. Hospitality Fund for hospital entertainment, support of Downey 

Nursery, and maintenance of a Craft exchange where veterans may sell 
their handwork. 

The child welfare program includes gifts for children of disabled 
veterans, cash donations to Illinois Soldiers' and Sailors' childr- 
en's home, and sponsorship of two orphans at the Home. 

Each month, the Unit sends 100 tray favors to Jacksonville State 
hospital and often to all the Irving nursing homes. 

In May, the traditional veteran-made poppies are sold and the Unit 
helps plan and conduct Memorial services at Irving and several neigh 
boring cemeteries. 

Moncravie Unit is honored this year by having three district off- 
icers: Ruth Whitten, president; Virginia Caulk, secretary; and Edna 
Kelly, treasurer. 

Past Auxiliary presidents include Nina Meyers, Ruth McLean, Edna 
Kelly, Mary Rebnan, Emma Kessler, Faye Holmes, Verna Potterf, Edith St 
urgeon, Ruby Carriker, Gertrude Drew, Ada Lipe, Mabel Reichel, Charl- 
otte Morehead, Mary Bryce, Ruth Whitten, Virginia Caulk, and Sylvia 
Lyerla . 

Moncravie Unit past presidents have united with the Hillsboro Pa- 
st Presidents Parley on a social basis. 

Meetings of both Post and Unit are the first Wednesday of each 
month at the American Legion Hall. 



ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR IRVING 



orga 

Matr 
Matr 
Bart 
Hunt 
Grac 
Maym 
der ; 

berl 
in t 



Wort 
Patr 
Cond 
Chap 
Adah 
Ila 



Carnat 

nized o 

Charte 

on ; Ch 

on; Ann 

iett, C 

er , Ch 

e Stump 

e Rhoad 

Samuel 

Meet in 

and Pre 

he Ma so 

Gerald 

member 

Presen 

hy Patr 

on; Fr 

uctress 

. ; Bess 

; Georg 

Jurgena 



ion Cha 
n June 
r membe 
arles E 
a Cocke 
onductr 
aplain; 
, Adah 
s. Mart 

Hunter 
gs were 
sbyter i 
nic Hal 
ine Cre 

of Car 
t offic 
on; E i 
ankie F 
; Romel 
ie Beas 
ia Hodg 
, Elect 



pter 
22, 

rs 

. Pa 
Irea 
ess ; 

Ar 

; G 

ha ; 
, Se 
hel 
an c 
1 wh 
ss o 
nati 
ers 
leen 
unk , 
ta N 
ley, 
kins 
a; 2 



No. 
1915. 
elect 

dgett 
s , Se 
Cec 
thur 
erald 

Gert 
ntine 
d in 
hurch 
ich i 
f Hil 
on ch 
are C 

Huds 

Seer 
eisle 

Mars 
on, R 
elma 



771 Order of the Eastern Star was 




ed to office were Alice Bartlett, Worthy- 
, Worthy Patron; Dilcie McLean, Associate 
cretary; Cora Blizzard, Treasurer; Frances 
il V/iley, Associate Conductress; Catherine 
Bartlett, Marshal; Dories Rupe, Organist; 
ine Blizzard, Ruth; Ruth Crouch, Esther;- 
rude Sullivan, Electa; Julia Counton, War- 
1. 

the Masonic Hall which was the former Cum- 
. The meetings at the present time are held 
s the entire top floor of the Caulk Grocery. 
Isboro is the only Charter member who still 
apter. 

lara Jachino, Worthy Matron; Homer Coffey, 
on, Associate Matron; Charlie Funk, Assoc, 
etary; Linda Berry, Treasurer; Mary Fath, 
r. Associate Conductress; Fannie Thompson, 
hal; Wilma Tomamichel, Organist; Ava Wells 
uth; Joan Powis, Esther; Joyce Funk, Martha 
White, Warder; Alan Hodgkinson, Sentinel. 



MO tTOCK MLB 
EVERY MONDAY 

SLATER 
SALES PAVILION 

Pana Phone 3394 or 7U0 

Ask about our complete 
Auction Sale Service 



Don Andrews Insurance Agency 



"On The Sq'uare' 



HILLSBORO, ILLINOIS 



HESELOV'S 



Style Shop 



LADIES READY-TO-WEAR 



Phono KE 2-2511 



Hlllsboro, Illinois 



Compliments Of 

AMWAY PRODUCTS 




Aum^ 



OPEL BROWN GARY BROWN 
PANA, ILL. 



ABC NURSERY 

SCHRUBS 8. TREES Irving, Illinois 

HANK 8. BONNIE SCHWENDEMANN 



Compliments of 

GEORGE GINOS 

Attorney-at-Law 
Hillsboro, Illinois 



LYERLA'S FOOD STORE 



Groceries, Meats, Frozen Foods 
Produce - Fruits - Vegetables 



HILLSBORO, ILLINOIS 



A. D. Pattie 



44;{ S. Main St. 
HnXgBOBO. UJL. 



Compliments of 

HOWARD'S SHOE STORE 



Hillsboro, Illinois 



rambo's 



_1 



Wallpaper - Paint - Supplies 

HILLSBORO, ILLINOIS 



48 



MASONIC LODGE NO. 455 A.F. & A.M. 



year 
year 

E. B 
Cox, 

Ward 

1868 

and 

form 

and 

and 

bull 

memb 
Keis 

Laps 
kins 

Deac 
Bate 
Mars 



Irving Lodg 
, 1865. The 

and charter 
arnes, Georg 

William B. 

The first o 
en, E. B, Ra 

A hall wher 

and was own 
all records 
er Irving ba 
Winn Hali u 
after severa 
ding was bou 

The Lodge n 
ers have rec 
ling, Roy C. 

Present of 
ansky, Senio 
on, Treasure 
on; Alvin La 
s. Senior St 
hal; Reed Ca 

Meetings ar 



e No 
char 
me 
e M. 
VanH 
ffic 
ndle 
e m 
ed b 
were 
nk. 
ntil 
1 ye 
ght. 
ow h 
eive 
Par 
f ice 
r Wa 
r; 

psan 
ewar 
rver 
e he 



. 455 A.F. & A. 

ter was granted 

mbers were E. B 

Davenport, H.T 

orn, William M, 

ers were 'Worsh 

; Junior Warden 

ost of the firs 

y the organizat 

burned. This 

After the fire 

the Lodge pur 

ars the upper s 

This hall is 
as a membership 
d fifty year pi 
khill, James V. 
rs are Homer C 
rden; Archie F 
Charles Deluka, 
sky, Junior Dea 
d; Glenn Marti 
, Tyler. 
Id the first Mo 



M . was in 

on Octob 
. Randle, 
. Huestis 

Cox, and 
ipful Mas 
, George 
t meetin 
ion. It w 
hall was 
, meeting 
chased th 
tory of t 
still the 

of one h 
ns and ar 

Maurey , 
offey, W 
. Friese, 

Secretar 
con; Car 
n, Junio 



stituted in the 
er 4 of the sam 

B. S. Pitts, B 
, John E, Lindl 

Ryland Tuck, 
ter, B. S. Bar 
M. Davenport, 
gs were held w 
as later destro 
located at the 
s were held i 
e old Presbyte 
he former F.P. 

meeting place, 
undred thirty-s 
e Walter V. Ber 
and F. P. Willi 
orshipful Mast 

Junior Warden; 
y; John L. McCa 
1 Larson, Chapl 
r Steward; Don 



. Leon, 
ey, John 




nes ; Senior 

as built in 
yed by fire 
site of the 
n the Kelly 
rian church 
Cockelreas 

ix, five- 
ry, Fred H. 
ams . 

er; Arnold 
Alan Hodg- 
11 , Senior 
ain; Robert 
aid Rundlc, 



nday evening of each month. 



Among members advanced higher in Masonry are the foll- 
owing Shriners: John Rhinehart, Mat Wemblinger, LeRoy Martin 
Glenn Martin, Glenn Wells, Clarence Doerr, Kenneth Martin, 
Olin Snyder, Drexel Neisler, and Walter Neisler. 

' 9 ^- 

IRVING UNIT-MONTGOMERY COUNTY HOMEMAKERS EXTENSION ASSOC. 




The Irving Home Bureau Unit was 
home of Mrs. Minnie Eddington with fou 
Wednesday of each month was selected 
elected viexe chairman, Declecia Whit 
Secretary, Ellen Reed; Treasurer, Pea 
was held in April at the home of Zelma 

Over a period of years the Unit 
including sewing, cooking, home decora 

Busses have been charted several 
to visit places of interest. 

Four different times a booth wa 
Farmers Institute and each tine they r 

The Irving Unit celebrated its 
1957 at the Irving School. Three remai 
Declecia White, and Minnie Eddington 
Pins. 

Miss Bennett was County Home Ad 
organized and the present Home Advisor 
Jones. The name "Home Bureau" was chan 
ociation" in July, 1962. 

Present officers: Chairman, Declec 
Malin; Secretary, Jean Eddington; Trea 



organized March 18, 1947 at the 
rteen charter members. The first 

for the meeting date. Officers 
e; Vice Chairman, Zelma V/hite; 
rl Eddington. The first meeting 

White, 
has had many practical projects 
ting and civic interests. 

times to give members a chance 

s entered by the Irving Unit at 
eceived the "Blue Ribbon", 
tenth anniversary on March IB 
ning charter members, Etta King, 
were each presented Home Bureau 

visor when the Irving Unit was 

is Betty Fox assisted by Shirl- 

ged to "Honemakers Extension Ass 

ia White; Vice Chairman, Mrs. Joe 
surer, Nell Botkin. 



49 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
E L AINE' S BEAUTY SALON 

8:30 tD 5 o'clock 
TUESDAY - THRU SATURDAY 

EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT 
ELAINE HOUSE IRVING, ILL. 



COMPLir^ENTS OF 
M I -ED SHELTER CARE 

SINCE 1951 THE ONLY SHELTER-CARE 
HOME IN MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

THE NEAREST HOME TO YOUR OWN 
MRS. MINNIE EDDINGTON-OWNER-OPERATOR 



NOKOMIS VAULT SERVICE 
COURTEOUS SERVICE PROTECTION BEAUTY 
In your hour of sorrow they offer 
you a vault to protect the casket 
and its precious contents against 
water in the ground Ask your funi 
eral director to show you. It com 
es in a variety of colors, priced 
within your means. You may call 
to inspect the vaults. Plant loca 
ted on Coalton road i mile east - 
of Whitlock's VJelding Shop. 
JAMES MASULIS PH. 58W NOKOMIS, ILL. 



Compliments of 



KELLY'S FOOD SERVICE 

PACKERS AND DISTRIBUTORS 

QUALITY FOODS 
PHONE KE-2-2424 HILLSBORO, ILL. 



COMPLI^ENTS OF 

HAYCRAFTS GENERAL STORE 
GROCERYS & MEATS 

HIGH PRICES Paid FOU poultry «. EGGS 
WORTH HAYCRAFT WITT, ILL. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

c arloc k & so n 

BUS-SERVICE FARM SUPPLIES 

ARTHUR CARLOCK PHONE 70R2 

a 

SON - CLYDE CARLOCK COFFEEN, ILL, 



COMFLir.ENTS OF 



VOGUE BEAUTY SHOP 



LOUISE HALLERS ROUTE - 127 - SOUTH 



~YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOf^t AT 

/Anderson's (Department Store 

NATIONALLY ADV. — QUALITY MD3E . 

GOGSARD FOUNDATIONS MUNSINGWEAR 

: OSHKOSH WORK CLOTHES 

WING SPORT SHIRTS MYNETTE DRESSES 
PAD, PADDLE & SADDLE SPOR'lbWHAR 
BEAUTIFUL FABRICS NOTIONS PATTERNS 
LOW PRICES BETTER QUALITY 



50 



WOf.EN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION 
LOYAL TEMPERANCE LEGION 

Around the year 1910 and for about ten years, a thriving organi — 
zation of the Women's Christian Tenperance Union was active in Irving 
with a large membership. 

In 1912 a Loyal Temperance Legion Club, a children's organization 
was formed with fifty members. Directors were Rena Satterlee, Delia 
Coffey and Esther Schraudt. Meetings were held at the Free Methodist 
and Methodist churches and the Irving school. The work of both organi- 
zations was discontinued a few years later. 

Again in 1950 the Loyal Tenperance Legion held weekly meetings 
at the Methodist church, the director being Miss Esther Schraudt. The 
work has grown from year to year and for several years weekly meetings 
are held from the first of October to the last of April. The past year 
has been one of the best with a membership of thirty, carrying out the 
program of service and study prescribed by the National Office. 

Officers for 1963 are Valerie White, President and Steven Handle, 
Vice President. 

A public meeting is held each year to close the work. The club 
plants and cares for flowers on two plots of ground on Main Street 
and enjoys the friendship and help of many who encourage them in their 
work. ^^ ^^ -^^ 

WWW 




COMPLIMENTS 




HOMER RADER 

LUMBER YARD 

Retail Yard of All Kinds of Building Material — Hardwood and Fir 

Deliver Anyplace in Montgomery County 

Phone KE 2-5335 Hillsboro, III. 



COMPLIVENTS 
OF 



JOHN M. ERNST 



DIST. OF 
PRCDUCTS 



r^gl HILLSBOR( 



HENRY'S Greenhouse 

1409 Vandalia Road 
Member Floral Telegraph Delivery 

RALPH AND WINNIE MOLLMAN 



COMPLIMENTS 

C&W GARAGE 



SERVICE IS WHAT WE GIVE 
PHONE 72-K NOKOMIS, ILL. 



COMPLIMENTS 

BOWLING AT ITS BEST 




WM. SHOPPIE LITCHFIELD, ILL. 



COMPLIMENTS 

EDGECOMBE HATCHERY 
INC. 

NOKOMIS, ILL. 
(Birthplace of little shavers) 



■DRIVE-IN 



PACKAGE LIQUOR AND SPORTING GOODS 



21)6 SCHOOL STREET 



HIILSBORO, ILLINOIS 



STOREM 



PHONE KEIIogg 2-3884 



52 



ANTI-THIEF ASSOCIATION 



cars 
a ne 
the 

were 
Seer 
Guar 
Fran 
Whit 
Caul 
Harv 

ing 
bers 
ehen 
over 
of t 



Pres 
Seer 



In 1890 the 
and tractors 
w charter wa 
name being ch 
1947, the Irv 
Howard Davis 
etary; John K 

d. Other mem 
k Drev/, Ivan 

e, iVayne McCu 
k, V/illiam G 
ey Bohlen, Ch 
The Anti-Thie 
citizens who 

against thie 
ding and brin 
y of stolen p 
he flag, patr 

Because of t 
Present offic 
ident; Finer 
etary; Clem M 



Irv 

rep 
s gr 
ange 
ing 
, Pr 
luth 
bers 

Cau 
lley 
rubb 
arle 
f As 
have 
ves 
ging 
rope 
iot i 
he A 
ers 

Edd 
eise 



ing An 
laced 
anted 
d to A 
Anti-T 
esiden 
e , Tre 
at t 
Ik, We 
, Huge 
s, Ro 
s Eddi 
sociat 

bande 
and to 

to ju 
rty; 
sm and 
.T.A. 
are CI 
ington 
nheime 



ti-Ho 
hors 
the I 
nti-T 
hief 
t; W. 
asure 
hat t 
ndell 
ne Da 
y Den 
ngt on 
ion i 
d tog 
coop 
stice 
and t 
char 
Irvin 
arenc 
, Sec 
r , Ma 



rse 
es t 

Uin 
hief 
Asso 

J. 

r; R 

ime 

Kes 
vie , 
ton, 
, an 
s an 
ethe 
erat 

all 
ed 
ity 
g To 
e Po 
reta 
rsha 



Thi 
he a 
ois 

Ass 
ciat 
Lort 
ober 

wer 

sler 

Ro 

Joh 
d Dr 

org 
r fo 
e wi 

sue 
ucat 
to t 
v/nsh 
Pe, 

ry; 

1; C 



ef As 
ssoci 

divi 
ociat 
ion w 
s, Vi 
t Bry 
e R OS 
, Wil 
y Rup 
n Rhi 
exel 
aniza 
r mut 
th th 
h Off 
e our 
he ne 
ip is 
Presi 

Jose 
lem M 



sociation flourished. As 
ation disbanded. In 1921 
sion of the association, 
ion. 

as organized and officers 
ce President} Glenn Rupe, 
ce, Marshal; George Bryce 
s Jarrett, Paul Skinner, 
liam K. Hamilton, Raymond, 
e, Thomas Hartman, Lynn 
nehart, Erank Newberry, 
Neisler . 

tion composed of law abid 
ual protection of its mem 
e civil authority in appr 
enders; to aid in the rec 

citizenship in the love 
edy and to all the order. 

a better place to live, 
dent; Raymond White, Vice 
ph Tomamichel, Financial 
cCulley, Guard. 



LADIES AUXILIARY A. T.A, 



A 
Associa 

Th 
of Illi 
Decleci 
Secreta 
Ruth Br 
H leaner 
Norma C 

Th 
It help 
takes c 

Pr 
Vice Pr 
.Myrtle 
Guard ; 



Ladies 
tion wa 
e Irvin 
nois. I 
a White 
ry; Iri 
ov;n, C 
White, 
a ulk , a 
e motto 
s membe 
lothes 
esent o 
es ident 
Armentr 
Audrey 



Auxiliary to the Illinois Division of the Anti-Thief 
; organized in November, 1948. 

3 Ladies Aux. of the A. T.A. was the sixth in the State 

L was organized June 13, 1949 when officers elected were 

, President; Lillie Rupe, Vice President; Leda Davis, 

5 McLean, Financial Secretary; Wilma Tomamichel, Marshal 

-haplain; Marjory McCulley, Guard. Other Members were 

Essie Caulk, Zelma White, Betty Caulk, Orgie Denton, 

ind Rose Caulk. 

of the L.A. is to encourage right and discourage wrong. 
?rs in sickness and death, helps senior citizens, and- 
and food to the needy. 

ifficers are Marie McCulley, President; Declecia White, 

Luella Eddington, Secretar; Wilma Tomamichel, Treas.;- 

■out, Marshal; Laura "cNew, Chaplain; Edith Me isenheimer , 

.'anning. Sentinel; Margaret Moxey, Patriotic Instructor. 




CONGRATULATIONS 

Montgomery County 
Abstract Co 

Abstracts — Title Insurance • 
East Side Courthouse Square HiUsboro, Ulinoi* 
DON B. NICHOLS «"">"• KE 2-2822 



CONGRATULATIONS 



KELLER IMPLEMENT CO 



FARM EQUIPMENT 

ALLIS CHALMERS KEWANEE 

NEW IDEA 
PHONE 5 NOKOMIS ILL. 



FOR GOOD RESULTS 
FEED 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



yvoo** 



M. 



on^ 



"CALL" FRANKLIN C. BUNTON 
B0X462 PHONE KE2 2126 



409 HILLSIDE 



HILLSBORO 



COMPLETE LINE 
OF 
VARIETY AND SOFT GOODS 
NOKOMIS ILL. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



MEN'S AND BOY'S CLOTHINO 




LITCHFIELD, " ILUNOIS 

A Complete 

Line of Men's 

and Boy's Clothing 



DAVENPORT'S FLOWERS 

Kathryn Brown, Prop. 



Flowers For All Occasions 



COMPLI^yENTS 
OF 

GUY F AR QUH A R 



Men's Store 

MENS CLOTHING & FURNISHINGS 

WE GIVE TOP VALUE STAMPS 
LITCHFIELD ILLINOIS 



NOKOMIS 

NEWS STAND 



MAGIZINES 

BOOKS 

CIGARS 

CIGARETTES 

CANDY 

VERNON COPPLE 



HOBBIES 

GIFTS 

SUNDRIES 

CARDS 

NEWSPAPERS 



PHONE 36K 



54 



THE AMERICAN LEGION MONCRAVIE POST 425 



Mon 
August, 

and Shir 
World Wa 

The 
was the 
Main Str 

Aft 
met in t 
In 1940 
side of 
for meet 

The 
boys at 
a hospit 

Thi 
bers .The 

Pas 
Meyers , 
Willis S 
Kelly, 
Charles 
Caulk , J 



cravie 
1919 wi 
ley Mon 
r 1. 

first 
room ab 
eet but 
er the 
he Cock 
the Pos 
f.:a in St 
ings an 

Post h 
Boys' S 
al bed, 
s year 

presen 
t comm 

Grin C 
turgeon 
Michael 
Braden, 
ohn A. 



Poet 425 of the American Legion was organized in 
th 30 charter members. It was so named for James 
cravie, Brothers who gave their lives in action in 




Fo 
f ollowi 
ed Stat 
petuate 
and inc 
Individ 
the aut 
master 
and tra 
nocracy 
to nutu 



r God a 
ng purpo 
e s of Am 
a one-h 
idents o 
ual obli 
ocracy 
of might 
nsmit to 
; toco 
al helpf 



comma 
ove t 

sine 

Auxi 
elrea 
t bou 
reet 
d sup 
as be 
tato , 

wa Ik 
the m 
t com 
ander 
res s , 
, Gl 

Wale 

Del 

Downs 

M one 
nd CO 
ses : 
erica 
undre 
f our 
gatio 
of bo 
; to 

post 
nsecr 
ulnes 



nder 
he I 
e ma 
liar 
s Ha 
ght 

and 
pers 
en a 

bas 
ers 
embe 
mand 
s ar 

Cha 
oyd 
her , 
bert 
, La 
ravi 
untr 
to u 
n; 
d pe 

ass 
n 1 
th t 
prom 
erit 
ate 



was Clinton File and the first meeting place 
rving Times printing shop, a building still on 
de into two apartments. 

y was organized in 1931, both Post and Unit 
11 until it was purchased by the Masonic Lodge 
and remodeled the corner building on the East 

recently an addition was made for more room 



ct ive 
eball 
and wh 
rship 
er is 
e Clin 
rles L 
McLean 
Ceci 

Br own 
wrenee 
e Post 
y we 
phold 
to mai 
rcent 
oe. in 

the c 
he ela 
ote pe 
y the 
and s 



in CO 

teams , 

eel eh 

has r 

Stanle 

ton Fi 

ivings 

, Guy 

1 Lipe 

Sta 

Brown 

str iv 

assoc 

and de 

ntain 

Amer i 

the g 

ommuni 

sses 

ace an 

pr inci 

anetif 



mmunity se 
and Boy S 
airs to b 
cached an 
y Everley, 
le. Dr. R 
ton. Char 
E . Lewis , 
, Howard 
nley Everl 
, and John 
es to live 
iate ours 
fend the c 
law and o 
canism; t 
reat wars; 
ty, state 
and the ma 
d good wil 
pies of j 
y our comr 



rvice , ha 
couts, and 
e used in 
all-time h 

a World W 
. N. Canad 
les Madge, 
Dean Cun 
Whitten, 
ey, Thoma 

Walters. 

up to the 
elves tog 
onstitutio 
rder; to 

preserve 
to incule 

and nati 
sses ; to 

1 on earth 
ustiee, fr 
adeship b 



ving sponsored 
has purchased 
the community, 
igh of 88 mem- 
arll veteran, 
ay, William H. 
John Reichel, 
ningham, Harry 
George Bryce, 
s Young, Lynn 



pled 
ether 
n of 
f oste 
the 
ate a 
on; 
make 
; to 
eedom 
y our 



ge: 

for the 
the Unit- 
r and per 
memories 
sense of 
to combat 
right the 
safeguard 
, and de- 
devotion 




55 



Compliments ot 
FRIGIDAIRE NOKOMIS, ILL. 

MAYTAG ^i/lj0 / / PHONE 15 



TJi ^kaw^d 



FURNITURE & HARDWARE CO, 

SALES AND SERVICE 

OWNER MANAGER CLERK 

FRED B. JOHMSON RALPH HECH RON CRAVENS 

SERVICE SALESMAN BOOKKEEPER 

PHILLIP SPINDEL JERRY CROW JEANETTE CHAUSSE 

COMPLIMENTS 

Vet MinttU 

When ^ ^ _ 

FISHING DECORATING 

not 



"SEE ME" YOU WON'T GET HOOKED 
MORRISONVILLE ILLINOIS 

COMPLIMENTS ~ 

OF 



WISCONSIN TAVERN 

FEATUREING WISCONSIN CHEESE 
MORRISONVILLE ILL. PHONE 3051 



A^ti(^(ic^ 



VISITORS AND DEALORS WELCOME 
CUT GLASS & HAVILAN CHINA 
A SPECIALITY 

FOUR MILES EAST OF IRVING, ILL. 
OFF ROUTE 16 
MRS GEORGE NEISLER PHONE KE3 4418 

MILDRED WEMLINGER IRVING, ILL. 



56 



IRVING BOOK CLUB 

The Irving Book Club Is a study club which meets each month. 

The original name of the club was "The Jolly Dozen" which was 
organized in 1915 when Mrs. L. R. Hammond and Mrs. Charles Sullivan 
decided they needed more social life. They invited four friends — 
to join them and each was asked to invite a friend to 
make a membership of twelve, including Mrs. Hammond, Mrs. Sullivan, 
Mrs. Ed Meyers, Mrs. Floyd Weeks, Mrs. Charles Carriker, Mrs. Dories 
Rupe, Mrs. Chester Kelly, Mrs. Jean Grantham, Mrs. Everett Brown, Mrs. 
Hal Whitten, Mrs. Homer Green, and Mrs. Grin Cress. 

The club continued to thrive, some of the members moved away, some 
died and others were asked to become members to keep the membership at 
twelve. 

Several years ago the name was changed to "The Book Club" and 
there are at present nine members, including Mrs. L. R. Hammond 
Mrs. Everett Brown, and Mrs. Hal Whitten who were charter members, 
Mrs. Ivan Lingle, Mrs. Howard Davis, Mrs. Glenn E. Wells, Mrs. Paul 
Downs, Mrs. L.V. Botkin, and Mrs. Guy Lewis. 



BUSY BEE COUNTRY CLUB 

The Busy Bee Country Club was organized during World War 1 by a 
group of farm women in the Irving vicinity as a v/orking unit of the 
Red Cross. They met regularly and knitted sweaters, scarves and hel- 
mets for boys in service. 

After the Armistice, the club disbanded and later reorganized, ta 
king in all members of the families and meeting monthly at the homes. 

During World War 11, the club again worked with the Red Cross, 
making layettes and other articles for hospitals and other places 
where needed. 

During the years, many quilts have been made for needy families 
and boxes of clothing have been collected to be taken where needed. 

Original charter members stil belonging to the club are Mr. and- 
Mrs. P. R. Baker and Mrs. Minnie Eddington. Now Children and grand- 
children of members are continuing in the work of offering help to all 
who are in need. 

Members of the present Busy Bee Country Club are the Homer Edding 
ton, Lynn Eddington, Homer Eugene Eddington, Norman Drew, P.R. Baker, 
James Roper families, Mrs. Minnie Eddington, Miss Bertha Burton, and- 
Miss Esther Schraudt. A 



WEDNESDAY CLUB 

Organized in 1927, the Wednesday Club has held monthly meetings 
all through the years. Mrs. Arthur Kelly started the club by inviting 
eleven young married friends to her home. 

In the beginning, pencil games and contests were held and later 
the Wednesday Pinochle Club was started. 

Several members dropped out and were replaced to keep the member- 
ship at twelve. 

Present members are Mrs. Louis Colonius, Mrs. Clarence Furness, 
Mrs. Chas. Eddington, and Mrs. Wilbur Jurgena who were charter members 
Mrs. Wilbur White, Mrs. Arthur Beasley, Mrs. Kenneth Berry, Mrs. Alan 
Hodgkinson, Mrs. Harry Funk, Mrs. Drexel Neisler, Mrs. C. L. Funk, and 
Mrs. Ivan Caulk. 

57 



W.K/Biir Jenkins 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 

Walker BIdg. — Hlllsbore 
Off. KE 2-57*5 Res. KE 2-5621 


CHARLES HUGHES 

GRINDING SERVICE 

GRINDING SERVICE 

LITCHFIELD, ILL. PH 324-3809 

GRINDING MIXING BLENDING 

DONE RIGHT ON THE FARM 




Compliments Of 

WALCH ELECTRIC 


Compliments of 

DR. W. T. DOUGLAS 

Hlllsbore, Illinois 


^^^ El! KFIIO I U)^^! JHi^ ^^^ 


INSULATING MACHINE FOR RENT 

Sales Service 

PHONE: STOBE ,276 RAYMOND, ILL. 


WAYNE'S OFF ICE SUPPLIES 

129S. LOCUST ST. 
PHONE 6471 PANA, ILL. 


TIMM'S 5c TO 1.00 STORE 

"Variety store merchandise for 

the entire family" 
HILLSBORO ILLINOIS 


compliments of 
kamer trucking 

OHLf'AN ILLINOIS 


compliments of 
boloing'S tavern 

jack & katie 's 

V/ITT ILL. 


BEST WISHES 

FUDOLI BARGIN STORE 

MIKE FUDOLI OWNER 
PHONE KE2-5440 HILLSBORO ILL. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

Pana WEDGE INN 

503 Fair Ave. 
Jim & Agnes Cory Owners 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
HAROLD LIFE MOTORS 

QUALITY USED CARS 

CDR. 2~o & DA< STS. CARS 

Phon..: Drric. 310 
PANA. ILLINOIS Ri«. 41DO 

t- 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 
R E 1 NKE HA ROW ARE 

Phone 1118 RAYMOND, iLL. 



58 



ages 
for 

ar a 
shar 

cr b 

Reyn 
Cris 
Glod 

book 
ther 

nas 
East 
for 
ume 

port 

Wayn 
McPh 



The P 
of ei 
girls 

Meet i 
t the 
es , 3i 
adgewo 
Avera 
olds , 
well , 
ene He 
Handw 
s, yar 
s' Day 
Social 
car ol i 
er Hyn 
a part 
in Sep 
Each 
of th 
Guide 
e Eddi 
erson 



lonee 
ght a 
in gr 
ngs a 
Irvin 
ble s 
rk, s 
ge at 
Conn 
Caro 
Ifer. 
ork P 
n oct 
, and 
gath 
ng, s 
ns at 
y eac 
tembe 
girl 
e org 
s are 
ngton 
and K 




roje 
opus 

fin 
er in 
kati 

Res 
h r.o 
r . 
has 
aniz 

Mrs 

an 

rs 



cts are making bathsalts, candles, sewcraft note — 
es, enbroidery pictures, May baskets, gifts for no- 
ger painting. 

qs include a wiener roast, Hallowe'en party, Christ 
ng party, Valentine party, St. Patrick party, singing 
t Haven, and a three mile hike. Plans have been made 
nth during the summer, and regular meetings to res- 

a Pal who gives fifty cents per month for the sup- 
ation and one gift during the year to her Girl, 
o Bradley Collins, Mrs. Kenneth Criswell, and Mrs. 
d party and refreshment committee, is Mrs. Ross 
Robert Eddington.. 

V / \ / \ ! ■ 

EARLIER PHYSICIANS 




the 
gran 

Fran 

Hamm 
zard 
Hutc 
Home 

was 
Roll 
who 
hone 

Mto 
Huds 



The Irving Hotel was built in 
middle 1800s by William .V.cClure. 
dfather of Eva File Sturgeon. 

Among other proprietors were- 
k McClure, A. H. Bartlett, L.R. 
ond, iVoH, Stewart and E.S. Bliz- 
. The last owners were the Lee 
hins family v/ho made it their 

A few years ago the building 
torn down and the land sold to 
and and Phyllis Hughes Uhlry- 

live at the former Moncravie 

nearby. 
The picture taken in 1910 shows 
and ivirSo V/.HoStewart and Maggie 
on, an employee. 



NCOME T AX SERV I CE 



For appointment call 

FARM BUREAU KE2 3773 
HOME KE2 2009 
POCKLINGTON BROS. SEED CORN 



CARL NIEHAUS 



BUTLER, ILL. 



Compliments 
of 



MIDWAY TAVERN 

PHONE 2101 
HARVEL ILLINOIS 



INSURANCE 



PP ^"RF -> 



( INSURE 



CLARENCE POPE 

Insurance Agency 

DEPENDABLE INSURANCE 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



DR. HAROLD T. HAMMOND 

DENTIST 



HILLSBORO 
KE2 2648 



PHONE IRVING 
"^ KE3 4552 



506 WASHINGTON 



HILLSBORO 



CONGRATULATIONS 
IRVING 



R 



CENTENNIAL 



ice<s 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

RUSSELL PEARCE 

Upholftry S*rv i c e Co 




a/c 



TRUCK SEATS 



BOAT SEATS 



HELEN & TOM RICE 



IRVING 



BETWEEN 

HILLSBORO & LITCHFIELD 

NEAR WSMI 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



WITT ELEVATOR CO 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



FERTILIZER 



FEEDS 
WITT 



COAL 
ILLINOIS 



JOE * H ELENS TAVERN 



•»SCHLITZ*MILLERS'*ON TAP 
PIZZA PIE tfHIHi^ LAMB FRIES 
JOE & HELEN MANIOTTI 
OWNERS 

ROUTE 16 
KE2 2286 SCHRAM CITY 



60 




THE IRVING Tlf.^S OF YESTERDAY 



The first Irving Times building was on the corner near the present 
fire engine building and the weekly newspaper was started in the 1890s 

The first editor was San Cottrell who later sold out to Clark Rob- 
erts and A. K. Vandever. Mr. Vandever bought Mr. Robert's interest and 
was assisted in editing the paper by his sons, Lester and Ed. 

It is unknown just when the Times operated in the concrete block 
building which is pictured but the paper was printed in this building 
for many years. 

Among the editors of the paper were Rev. O.K.Doney, Jesse Sanders, 
C.L. Cockelreas, Arthur Bartlett, F. P. '.Villiams, Lester Truitt, J.H. 
Carriker, and Ross Berry. Typesetters and other employees included 
Delia Coffey, Mabel Truitt, C.A. Grantham, Lucile Carriker, Hazel Ste- 
wart, Floyd V/eeks, Gertrude Host, Eva Bond, and Kate Ault. 

Clippings and advertisements from some of the old papers: 

1903: "T. R. Coffey's have the small pox, his wife and one child 
being down with the disease, hence the quarantine. Dr.Fullerton thinks 
that with the undivided support of the people the small pox can be con 
fined to the one family." 

1905: "Chas. Vandever left Tuesday for Tulsa, Indian Territory, 
He will again work at the barber trade. He expects to open up a shop 
and locate permanently in the territory." 

"Foundl A Suitcase with clothing in it was found in C.C. Ault's 
cornfield. Owner call and pay charges and receive it. Mrs. C.C. Ault." 

"A lot of 40 and 42 Blue Stripe overalls worth 75 cents, go at 50 
cents a pair while they last. C. B. McKinney.'" 

"Shirts with a guarantee, prices 50c, 75c, and 31.00. Berry and 
Harkey. " 

"Round Oak stoves at Lingle and Ludewick." 

"Reduced to $2.48 per suit, the "Khaka" Army suits while they la- 
st. A. H. Kelly." 

1909: "J.R. Harkey has resigned from the Board of Directors of 
the Irving National Bank and has accepted a position with J.J. Frey's 
real estate office in Hillsboro, 

"I will sell Tower Hill Coa lump on car at $2.00 per ton, deliv 
ered at $2.25 - Ed Whitlock. 

"The Hot Blast Florence stove for sale by Auble and Grantham." 

"Hip overalls, 50cts«, blue denim jackets, 75 cts. Men's work sh- 
rts, 50 cts., F„ P. Cockelreas." 

61 



DFST WISHES 

MART'S 

NEW i. USED FUR NATURE 
WE BUY SELL OR TRADE 
PHONE KE2-2079 
1315 SCHOOL ST. 
MART HAYES HILLSBOR 07 • ILL. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

THE DUTCH MILL 

Seating Capacity One Hundred 
Fried Chicken -Sea Food Specials 
OPEN EVERY DAY 
6 A.M. TO 11:30 P.M. 
1709School St. Phone KE 2-2801 
E. SUBWAY ROUTE 16 
MRS.CURTISS NEELY Owner 
HILLSBORO ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 






STATE FARM 
INSURANCE CO. 



ROOT BEER 



HAMBURGERS 



LOUIS L. HUBER 



3 



CONEY DOGS 
KENNETH CHRISTIAN 

HILLSBORO, ILL. 



Phone KE 2-3052 



BEST WISHES 

MO D L A ' S 

GROCER Y 

MEAT 

FRESH VEGETABLES 

1607 School St. 
Andy Modla Schram City 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



'P"*^^'^ 



fj^ 



DIST. 
PABST AND MILLERS REER 



CONGRATULATICKS 
IRVING, ILL. 

NULIS 
TAP 

NOKCMIS, ILLINOIS 



STONE CO. 

AGRICULTURAL LIMESTONE 



PHONE 8 



ROAD ROCK 

NOKOMIS, ILL. 



62 



Irving Times cont'd. 

"Irving Harness Shop. Wagons — wagons-wagons, Joseph 
vehicle man of Montgomery County." 

"4 lbs. rice, 25 cents; 25 lbs. granulated sugar, $1 
granulated sugar, $5.00; coffee 20 cents per lb. at the 
R. McAfee, Manager." 

"Buy your shoes at Coffey*s shoe store, T.R. Coffey, 

"A safe place to put your savings. Irving National 

"School supplies. Arthur Kinkead'.' 

1912: " Miss Bessye Cockelreas has opened a new mi 
in the Spears building opposite Piatt's vehicle store. S 
uct the business herself, promising her customers courteo 
ient service." 

"Fall opening of Elzee hats at Huestis and Grantham* 

1918J 
"Dixie horse feed, $1.85 per hundred pounds, Bradshaw 

"Wiley's grocery for good things to eat." 

"For sale. One feather bed and one kitchen range. Mr 

"November 14, One of the noticeable features here i 
was Mrs. Elizabeth Moncravie, 72, carrying a big American 
Kelly acting as drum major led the parade and covered him 
ry with his antics." 



Piatt, The, 

.45; 100 lbs 
My Store, A. 

Proprietor? 
Bank." 

llinery store 
he will cond- 
us and effic- 



and Bryce." 

s. H.S.Baker." 
n the parade- 
flag. Albert 
self with glo- 



** 




Elizabeth 

Moncravie 
May 11, 1847 
August 11, 1948 



Clara 

Rebman 
April 27, 1859 
June 29, 1960 



Mary Fowler 

Will iams 
Feb. 14, 1834 
March 19, 1935 



FORMER IRVING RESIDENTS WHO LIVED OVER A CENTURY 



Among those who lived over 99 years are Sally Chambers and 
Clara Wells. 

Some who lived over 95 years include Prudence Coffey, Carrie 
McDowell, Lawrence File, William and Anna Wiley File, Thomas Eddington 
Anna Habey, and David Osborne (Still living). 



63 



Compliments Of 

Hillsboro. III. 



Compliments of 



LITCHFIELD QUARRY 



PHONE 324-2633 



LITCHFIELD, ILL 



SOY CITY TIRE AND TREADING. INC. 

DECATUR, ILLINOIS 

2525 North Water St. Phone 877-7300 




w 

>vv:<:iii:/4iiy 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Patton 
Funeral Home 

24 HR. AMBULANCE SERVICE 



608 S. MAIN HILLSBORO, ILLINOIS 



Compliments of 



SHORTS SUPER MARKET 

Groceries, Meats, Frozen Foods 
Ice Cream - Fruits ■ Vegetables 



PH. 57R2 COFFEEN, ILL. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

WESTERN AUTO 
ASSOCIATE STORE 



Compliments of 



WILLARD S. B ROWN 



WILLARD J. BROWN 



dltristian QniDersal Lift Insurance do. 



Western^utO 

Associate. 

Stbre ' 



HOMK OWNED BY 

JACK C. WOODS 
BILL ROACH. M-jr. 



210-211' N. State 
LITCHFIELD. ILL. 
PHONE 
324-3511 



CONGRATULATIONS 

W SM I 

- 1540 

AND 
WSMI -FM 106 

FOR ALL IMPORTANT "LAST WORD" 



64 



COUPLES WHO OBSERVED FIFTY OR MORE WEEDING ANNIVERSARIES 
AND DATES OF WEDDINGS 

Daniel and Melinda Irvin William and Helena Gregory 

Grantham 1858 Berry 1861 

Capt. A. A. and Penelope Nollie Joseph and Laura Morain 

McAllister Rhinehart 1862 Piatt 1871 

John and Sophia Powell Joseph and Elizabeth Williams 

Kelly 1873 Norvell 1873 

James and Mary File John and Emma Eddington 

Drew - 62 years - 1875 Hucker 1876 

Julius and Elizabeth Morain Wesley and Clara Brown 

Carriker - 70 years - 1877 Wells - 62 years - 1880 

Edward and Elizabeth Stewart Franklin and Elizabeth Schwing 

Lyerla 1880 King - 64 years - 1882 

Preston and Emma Grantham Frank and Mary Goodnight 

Williams 1882 Voils 1883 

Charles and Elizabeth Lipe Wilson and Dora Sanders 

Hefley 1884 Lyerla 1884 

Ike and Lula Wright Charles and Eva Wiley 

Welch 1885 Tobias 1887 

Lawrence and Elizabeth McDavid William and Sarah B. Wiley 

File 1886 Morain 1890 

William and Anna Wiley Amasa and Lena Rucker 

File - 70 years - 1890 King 1890 

William and Dora Grantham Thomas and Sophia Eddington 

Neisler 1890 Eddington 1890 

Orland and Ida Chambers Albert and Nellie McHugh 

Lingle 1890 White - 60 years - 1891 

Luke and Kate Thacker George and Effie Harris 

Fath - 60 years - 1891 Bryce 1892 

Charles and Illinois l^ope Stephen and Cora Wiley 

Everett 1892 Brown 1892 

Frank and Nancy Lawson Frank and Grace Lingle 

Rhinehart 1893 Berry 1894 

Henry and Mildred Gilmore Frank and Esther Larkin 

Beckmier 1896 Singler 1896 

Thomas and Lida Ross Albert and Iva Gregory 

Daly 1898 Kelly 1898 

Frank and Belle Grantham Frank and Mary Carriker 

Hughes 1899 Lipe. 1900 

Jesse and Gertrude Sturgeon Pearl and Laura Perkins 

Drew 1901 Carriker - 61 years - 1901 

Charles and Flo Mock Joseph and Minnie Groner 

Perkins 1904 Eddington 1904 

VJalter and Abigail Lyerla Joseph and Cleo Williams 

Berry 1905 Tomamichel 1906 

Fred and Belle Vandever Charles and Mary Walker 

Lyerla 1906 Everley 1906 

William and Bertha Fogle Humbert and Myrtle Piatt 

Wilhelm 1906 Ludwick 1907 

Clifford "Pat" and Olive Wilson Pemberton and Velma Neisler 

McElroy 1907 Wilhelm 1009 

Pearl and Katherine Brookman Taylor and Oley Wilhelm 

Baker 1909 Owens 1910 

Harvey and Susan Drew 

Neisler 1910 

65 



THE IVILSON LYERI.A FAMILY 

Wilson Lyerla (1863-1942) and Dora Sanders (l 864-1 944 ) were born and 
reared in Irving Township. They were married in 1884, and lived all of 
their married life in Irving with the exception of two years spent in 
Alton. Wilson was a farmer most of his life, but later became the town 
constable for a number of years. They were the parents of eight child- 
ren; Earl (deceased); Ruby, who died at birth; Una Strahan, Audrey- 
Mullens and Zella, a}l of Alton; Jesse (deceased); Ray of Irving; and 
June Ball of Las Cruces, New Mex. There are ten grandchildren , twenty^. 
one great-grandchildren, and one great-^reat-grandchild . Wilson has 
two sisters living; Millie Sturgeon of Cordell ,Okla . who was 105 years 
old Dec. 29, 1962, and Annie Copoland of Geneva, 111. who is 95 years. 

THE CHARLES BAILEY FAMILY 

Silas Bailey was born Nov. 8, 1839, died Mar. 21, 1894. He came- 
to Illinois from West Virginia. He and Wilma Satterthwaite , from 
Brown County, Ind. were married Jan. 25, 1866. They reared eleven 




Alfred Rhinehart, of Irving on Oct. 1, 1895. To this union ten 
children were born: Nollie, William (Grant), Alfred, .Vil±a, Ivan, 
Juanita, Veda, Wanda, Charles, and Alva. Alfred was born Feb. 14, 
190C. He and Erblean Geminden of Sedalia, Mo. were married Dec. 1, 
1928. They are the parents of three children, Juanita, Robert, and 
Richard. In 1945 the family came to Irving, and in 1946 Alfred- 
bought the Bailey home place. Charles, his father continued to live 
there until his death. The grandchildren are; Cindy and Pam Dailey, 
daughters of Robert Bailey; and Kent, Kurt, Kyle and Karis, sons of 
Cecil and Juanita (Bailey) Schmedeke. 

••••• 

THE JAMES McDowell family 

James McDowell was born in Adair County, Kentucky, February 14, 
1842, came to Illinois in 1860 and settled in Montgomery County. His 
parents, John and Lucinda Rippetoe McDowell were natives of Kentucky 
He, a farmer, was born 1809 and died 1850. She, born 1811, died 1878. 
James, youngest of four sons received his education in Kentucky and be 
came a teacher, later a house painter and in 1873 began a mercantile 
business in Irving. He was town clerk for twelve years. April 5, 1865- 
he married Sara Caroline Wubker and to this union was born 6 children, 
VJalter, Helena Slagle, Edward, Logan, Clarence, and Charles. James Mc- 
Dowell died in 1919 and his wife in 1944. 

••••• 

Remember v/hen there was a large lumber yard with a two story 
building about two blocks north of Ileisler Feed and Grain office, 
the building housing the horsedrawn hearse and the latest in cask 
ets priced at S20,00 and $30.00 service included? 



Remember when the residents v/ere often awakened at night by a 
group of harmonizers, among them being Vi'ill and Ed Haller, Clarence 
Wiley, Will Crouch, Floyd 'Weeks, and Jack Hebman? 



66 



THE GEORGE BRYCE FAMILY 

James and Jennett Bryce had a son George born in Canada in 1861 
later moving to Illinois in 1892, married Effie Harris and farmed east 
of Irving. They reared four children; Beulah Jewett, Camilla Singler, 
Edith Sturgeon, and Ralph, born in 1894 and still residing on the farm. 
He and Mildred Grantham were married in 1915. She was the daughter of 
John and Cora Grantham,, They are the parents of two sons, Robert and 
George. Robert married Helen Jackson in 1937, They have a daughter, 
Penelope who married Lee Bales. Robert is living on the originsl 
Bryce farm and is employed by Eagle Picher Company in Hillsboro. 
George married Mary K. Hugener in 1942, and they have two sons Mark G. 
and Nathan Lee. George was appointed postmaster in Irving in 1955, 
and is still serving. -m^^^ 

THE ROBERT CAULK FAMILY 

John R. Caulk and Sarah Bell Caulk came from Kentucky on horseback 
in 1883 and settled in Rountree Township. They were parents of eleven 
children. VJhen one son, Robert was six years old, the family moved to 
Irving Twnsp. Robert and Essie Hilt were married in 1905. They farmed 
until 1937, then moved to Irving where he was janitor of Irving School 
until his death in '41, They were blessed with thirteen children: Ivan, 
Kenneth, LeWar, Bradley, Charlotte Nelson and Zelma White of Irving; 
Lynn, Marsha Dalzotto and Virginia Fravala of Hillsboro; Ada Morehead 
Michigan; Wade of Pennsylvania; lone Hines of East St. Louis; and a son 
Hilt, who died in 1930 at the age of eighteen. There are twenty-nine 
grandchildren and thirteen great-grandchildren. 

••••• 

THE WILLIAM S. BERRY, JR. FAMILY 

William S. Berry, Jr. son of Madison and Mary J.Christian Berry - 
and Helena Gregory, daughter of David and Rebecca Cress Gregory were- 
married in 1861. They v/ere the parents of six children, three dying in 
infancy; Minne (deceased) wife of Edd Burton; Frank (deceased); and 
Walter who married Abigail Lyerla. The Burtons were parents of four- 
children, all deceased except Earl who married Cleda Lyerla and they 
have three children. Walter was a teacher, merchant and Postmaster of 
Irving for thirty-one years. The Berrys have a son, Reginald who is a 
ciwil engineer for the State of Illinois and is married to Helen Buck. 
The Berry family was among the first settlers , helping to establish the 
town of Irving. William was a merchant and Postmaster for many years. 

THE ALBERT WHITE FAMILY 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert '.Vhite moved from McLean County to a farm north 
west of Irving, 111. in 1900. They established a fruit farm, specializ 
ing in strawberries. In 1940 they purchased a home in town. He passed 
away there in 1951 and she died in 56. She was a daughter of Benjamin 
and Emily McHugh who were of the earlier families of Irv. Their child- 
ren are Gertrude, Alberta, Raymond , Bessie , Ben, Bertha , Wilbur , Leslie, 
Marjory, Marguarite (deceased), Wayne, and William. There are thirty 
seven grandchildren, eight deceased. One son William and four grandsons 
served during World V.'ar 11, namely Theron Trimble, George Madge (kill- 
ed in the line of duty), Ray IVhite and Keith Warnsing. Ten were in ser 
vice after World War 11. Mr. and Mrs. Albert White had 115 descendants 
of whom 102 are living. 

••••••• 

Remember when commuters taking the early morning train didn't 
have to start from home until they could hear the clank-clank of milk 
cans being loaded for Pevely in St. Louis? 

67 



THE THOMAS H. PADGETT FAMILY 

Thomas Heniy Padgett (1840-1910) v/as born in Palmyra- 111. He was 
a Civil War Veteran. Priscilla Talley Allmond (1848-1915; was born in 
Willmington, Del. They were married in 1867 at Palmyra, 111. where 
three of their eleven children were born, before the family moved to 
Irving on a farm, then to town, where Mr. Padgett ran a Drug Store 
for many years. The children were; Anna, Reuben, William, Elizabeth, 
Charles, Thomas, George F«,Earl, Priscilla, Grace, and Powell. The old 
est son William, was Railway Station Ag_>nl for fifty years. Most of 
the boys were railroad men, and grew to manhood in Irving. Frank, 
Grace, and Powell are the only living members of their family. 

THE BENJAMIN McHUGH FAMILY 

Benjamin McHugh, merchant, school-teacher and farmer and his wife 
Emily moved to a farm near Irving in 1876. In 1878 they traded this 
farm and moved to East Fork where they managed a store and post-office 
for two years. In 1880 they returned to Irving and conducted a general 
merchandise store for one and a half years. Later they purchased a 
farm west Ox^ Irving, where they resided until his death, which occurred 
on May 7, 1900. He was killed by lightning while at his barn milking. 
He was 67 years old. They had ten children, five surviving him, namely 
Frank and Charlie McHugh, Mrs. Nellie White of Irving; Lewis of St. Lo 
uis and Mrs. Annie Pierce of Colorado, all now deceased. His wife mov 
ed to Irving and died January 1931. 

••••• 

THE BARNETT FAMILY 

Samuel F. Harnett (1874-1947) was the son of Newton M. and Charlotte 
Hawks Barnett. He came to Irving at the age of two years. Ella L. Bandy 
(1878-1947) was the daughter of Luther and Theodosia Vandever Bandy. 
Samuel and Ella were married January 1, 1892. They became the parents 
of seven children .Clinton, who married Bessie Ward (deceased), later- 
married Beatrice I'lasoner ; Dwight , who married Maude Eagleburger; Hester 
wife of 0. P. Miller; John, who married Helen Bussell; Charlotte, wife 
of Earl Morehead (deceased) later the wife of Lee Mooney; Alvin, who 
married Myrtle Ludwig Price; and Homer, who married Esther Westerman, 
later married Ruth Dunn. There are fifteen living grand-children, and 
two deceased, also thirty-five great-grandchildren. Samuel v/as a 
paper hanger and painter. 

THE HAMMOND FAMILY 

Logan Rodney (1882-1955) one of fourteen born to Curtis and Margaret 
(Hefley) Hammond on a farm north of Irving. Operated a meat-market and 
grocery in the Cockelreas building for over forty years .Retired (1945) 
because of ill health. Married Nelle Esther, daughter of Thomas and Abi 
lene (Saylor) Grantham. Three children were born. Dr. Harold Hammond and 
Mrs. Harry (Joyce) Funk of Hillsboro, Mrs. Alan (Georgia) Hodgkinson 
of Irv. Six grandchildren are Miss Carol Hammond, Dr. Larry Hammond of 
Chicago, Miss Martha Hammond of Hillsboro, Mrs . Henry (Joyce Hodgkinson) 
Barry of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Mrs. Leonard (Margaret Hodgkinson) 
Lesho of Stirling, New Jersey, Mrs. Charles (Marilyn Funk) Dammann of 
San Diego, California. Three great-grandchildren are Connie Hammond, 
Mark Barry, and John Lesho. The Hammonds are members of the Methodist 
^^^^^^' ••••• 

Remember when there were two of each of the following businesses 
in Irving at the same time — elevators, lumber yards, blacksmiths, mill- 
inery stores, general stores, butcher shops, doctors, restaurants, hard 
ware stores, livery stables, and five grocery stores? 

68 



THE REV. W. J. McDAVID FAMILY 

Rev. W. J.McDavid, son of John and Jane Knight McDavid and brother 
of Alben,John T.,Joel, Augustus, Logan and half-brother of Frank, lived 
most of his life in Irving Township. He married Barcie Foster and they 
had 8 children, Anna, Jesse, Inez, Eva Rhodes, Linda Meriwether, Rus- 
sel, Foster, and Joel. Anna, the oldest married Robert L. Kelly. They 
were the parents of Mildred, wife of Everett Brown (deceased); Foster 
who married Edna Fowler; and Arthur, who married Juanita Gaines; and 
they were grandparents of Virginia Kerpan, Eleanor Brown, Robert Kelly^ 
Carolyn V^alsh, Kathryn Jones and Richard Kelly. There are ten great- 
grandchildren and one deceased. W.J, McDavid was Pastor of the Presby- 
terian Church and served two terms as County Superintendent of Schools 

^••** 

THE WILLIAM H. HALLER FAMILY 

Wm. H. Haller, son of Edmond and Elizabeth Newberry Haller and 
Florence I. Ludewick, daughter of Martin A. and Emily Ann Lingofelter 
Ludewick were married September 13, 1896 by Rev. WmoJo McDavid, pastor 
of the Presbyterian Church. They became the parents of Ilah, Roy and- 
Floe (deceased). There are three grandchildren, Ivan L, Fesser, Roy W, 
and Gary F. Haller; seven great-grandchildren, Jeffrey John, Jon Scott, 
Elise Marie, children of Roy W. and Mary Haller; Christie Lynn, Georgia 
Lynn, daughters of Gary and Christine Haller; Brenda Kay and Michael 
Ivan, children of Ivan L. and Gail Fesser. William Haller carried mail 
thirty-one years, retiring in 1937. He and his wife celebrated their 
golden wedding in 1946. Mr. Haller died, 1953 and Mrs. Haller, 1960. 

••**• 
THE CORWIN KING FAMILY 

James Mark, son of John and Polly Ann King, was born in 1853 on 
a farm near Irving. He and Nancy Belle Rhodes were married and they 
were blessed with six children, Lyman who died in infancy, Lottie, 
William, Orville, Chester, and Corwin. Lottie married Martin Warn- 
sing in 1902. They had two sops, one dying at birth and Wayne who 
lives at Nokomis. VJayne and Helen Bower were married and they have 
two children. Mr. and Mrs. Martin Warnsing both died in 1963. William 
(deceased) married Bertha Loucks; Orville (deceased) married Estella 
Bowels; Chester married Hazel Hood, and they have two sons, Lyman 
and Bennie; and Corwin married Pauline Crouch and they have one daugh 
ter, Patsy Ann Sallee. There is one grandchild, Polly Sue Sallee. 

•*••• 
THE EPHRAIM LIPE FAMILY 

Ephraim Lipe (1870-1927), son of John Simeon and Catherine Weller 

Lipe, was one of nine children: two dying in infancy, and the others 

being Lizzie Hefley, Albert, John, Frank, Herbert, and Emma Thumb. 

Ephraim and Cora Cook were married, 1891. They became the parents of 
four children; Earl, who died in infancy; Eva, wife of Joe Busby of 
Detroit, Mich.; Lucille, wife of Frank Sowarsh of Irving, Illinois;and 
Mildred, wife of Gerald McElroy of Wickenburg, Ariz. The Busbys' have 
two children: LeMar, who married Mary Alice McConnell and they have a 
son Wayne; and Shirley, wife of Fred Wood and they have a daughter, 
Laurie. The Sowarshes' have four children: Robert, Wilma, wife of Eug- 
ene Spindle and they have two sons Edward and Richard; Myron who marr- 
ied Wanda Schneider and they have two sons Dennis and Rodney; and Bet- 
ty, wife of Marvin Schrempp and they have a daughter Sharon. The McEl- 
roys' have two children; Larry, who married Mary Anna Luck and they 
have threes sons Kevin, and twins Keith and Kelly, and Lynda, wife of - 

James Pavilk and they have a daughter Claire. Larry lives on and farms 

the Ephraim Lipe home place. 

•••*•* 

69 



THE SINGLER FAMILY 

Victor (1844-1889) was born in Damianville, 111. and Rosa Kuhner 
Singler (1850-1937) was born in Germany, settled in New Baden, moving 
to the Irving community in 1883. They were the parents of ten children 
John, Emma, Frank, Joseph, Ross, Fred, Mary, Melena, Victor and Henry. 
Mrs. Mary Huber residing in Hillsboro and Henry, an orthodonist, pract 
icing in Springfield are the only two surviving children. Fred Singler 
(1875-1936) with his parents, moved 2 miles east of Irving when he was 
eight years old. He was united in marriage with Cecelia Klain. They 
lived on the home place where two children were born, Evelyn, wife of- 
Martin Bock and Troy Singler. Fred's death was due to sunstroke. Troy 
and his mother lived on the farm until 1945 when she moved to Nokomis. 
Troy and Louise Wolf were united in marriage April 18, 1945, living on 
the Singler farm. Their family consists of Martha, Ronald and Randel. 
They are members of St. Barbara's Church in V/itt and Troy is a member 
of the Confraternity Board, Moose Lodge, Town Auditor, and Township 
Committeeman for A.S.C. k A. A. k k 

THE FRANK BERRY FAMILY 

Frank M. Berry (1862-1951) and Grace Lingle Berry (1871-1955) came 
to a farm in the E. part of Irving Township in 1901, retired and moved 
to Irving in '41. Three children were born, Corinne (Budina), Verda (He 
fer) and Kenneth who farms on the home place where he was born in 1904 
In "36, he and Linda Weerts were united in marriage. They are parents of 
twin daughters, Dolores Kay, a graduate of Eastern Illinois University 
and wife of John Hill of Jacks onvil le , 111 . ; and Doris Jean, a graduate 
of Barnes Hospital School of Nursing in St. Louis, Mo. and wife of Dr. 
James Swenson of Gillette, Wyoming. The Swensons have three children, 
Kelly Kay, Jamie Jean and Eric Jon. Mr. and Mrs. Berry are members of 
the Methodist Church and Eastern Star and Masonic Lodges. 

^^^^ 
THE JOHN GRANTHAM FAMILY . . . V ... . , . , . 

John Grantham (1861-1937) son of William and Mary (Patterson) Gran- 
tham was born in Irving. The Granthams were among the first settlers 
coming from Grantham, England. He and Cora Austin, the daughter of Rev, 
and Mrs. J. H. Austin, pastor of the Methodist Church, were married 
in 1889. He was a millwright and carpenter by trade and played in 
the Irving band. The Granthams were faithful members of the Methodist- 
Church. They were the parents of Bertha Wright of Peoria, Mildred Bry- 
ce, and Edith of Irving, and Austin (deceased) . The grandchildren are;- 
Rev. Harlan Wright, Earl and Paul Wright, Robert and George Bryce. The 
great-grandchildren are Steven and Martha Wright, Dale, Dean, Karen, - 
Randy, Mark, Lynn, and Gill Wright, Penny Bales, and Greg and Nathan- 
Bryce. 



CONGRATULATIONS IRVING 

ON YOUR 
HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY 
MR. AND MRS. FORREST P. WILLIAMS 



70 




father continued working on his farm, and raising cattle until he 
became quite old. His wife died at the age of 89, and he died 
three years later, April 15, 1949, at the age of 92. He had lived 
his entire life on the farm where he was born. The daughter Etta, 
_, — , ^ ,_-_ j^g ^^^ ^j^g only living member of the 




King)Morgan, Loretta, Linda, and Dale. Floyd married Rose Homann, 
nd they are the parents of Carol, Bruce, Jeffrey, and William, 
uonald married Maxine Simmons of Hillsboro, Walter lost his life 
in a tractor accident Sept. 12, 1960. His first wife, Chlo died 
suddenly July 24, 1951, his second marriage was to Alta Abernathy 
May 16, 1954. She survives with his children and grandchildren. 
Oscar and Lola Meacham were married April 7,1912, and they had 1 
son, Kenneth. He married Joyce Campbell of Hillsboro, where they 
made their home, he being employed as a water meter reader, and by 
Hucker Radio and TV service. Building houses was a hobby for spare 
time activity. He died suddenly after a heart attack, Aug. 18, '59 
aged 43, leaving his wife and daughter Thelma Christy of Decatur, 
111. She is now the mother of three children; Brenda, and twins 
Kenneth and Karen. Oscar later married Carrie McCaslin April 15, 
1951, and in '53 they left the farm and moved to Irving. He became 
ill, and died Jan. 15, 1962 aged 76. His wife, grandchildren and 
great-grandchildren survive. Several of the King families are mem 
bers of Lutheran Churches in different localities. 



THE PERK 
Joh 
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1885, an 
were: Sc 
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71 




187/ they movea to a larm in nuuntiec iuniiaiij-^- ..c-^ -iv-w. 

H.Peter Doerr (1868-1946) and Elizabeth Snith (1874-1941) were mar 

Tied March 8, 1894, at Harvel. They lived in ountree Township for ten 

years where Roy H.was born and passed away in 1904. They then purchased 

the farm in Irv. where Clarence and Gladys were born. Clarence was con 

irmed in the Irving Lutheran Church. He attended the Piatt School and 

raduated from Witt High School in 1924. He went to Kenosha, Wise, in 

. . .. A _# r> n »-.»«> 




ille, director on tne oxdxe Duaj.u ui unc j.j.i j.ii>^j.i> >- j.v,>- ..^ *- -- -r- 

iation, Springfield, Past Master of Irving Lodge A.F. and A.M. No. 455, 
ember of Eastern Star No. 771, and member of Springfield Consistory and 




ector and presi 



72 



THE BROOKMAN FAMILY 

E.O. "Orve" Brookman was born, 1853 in Bal 
1929. He lived in Irving and Butler communities 
erintendent of Mont. Co, Farm. He conducted a ge 
in a bldg. next to the town pump, ran a huckst 
and sorrell ponies for a number of years and th 
was spent in farming. He married Jennie Rhine 
1880 and she died in 1929. There were five chi 
infancy; Blanche, wife of R. J. Beals, both de 
wife of Elmer Baumberger, Granite City; James 
Park, Mich; Hugh, Grosse He, Mich.; Katie, wif 
mother of Joe Lyng Baker, Alameda, Calif., i 
Viola Fogle, wife of Otis Burke, Affton, Mo.; L 
ener, Nokomis, mother of Mary K. "Toots" Bryce 
Irving; Blanche, wife of William Nash, Nokomis 
Niehaus, Butler; Paul (deceased); and Chris, 
associated with Magnavox, Champaign, 111.; E.O 
Golden Rule and died believing everyone as hcne 

••••• 



timore, Md. and died in 
except two years as Sup 
neral store ten years - 
er wagon drawn by white 
e remainder of his life 
hart. Schoolteacher in 
Idreni two sons died in 
ceased, mother of Lois, 
(Jim) deceased, Lincoln 
e of P.R. Baker, foster 
n Civil Air Defense and 
aRue, wife of C.G, Hug- 
, wife of George Bryce, 
; Roberta, wife of Carl 
Jr., Paxton, Illinois, 
.Brookman lived by the 
St as himself. 




THE 

PRESTON H. 

WILLIAMS 

FAMILY 




Preston H. Williams and Emily Grantham were both born in 
Irving Township and lived in that community their entire lives. 
They were married March 29, 1882, and to this union four children 
were born; Cleo, Forest, Esther and Homer. Cleo married Joseph W, 
Tomamichel, and they were blessed with six children; the first 
being twins one of which died at birth. Those living are Mildred, 
Rollan, Joseph, Everett and Estel. Cleo passed away October 20, 
1962. Forest married Laura Jane Vincent and they had no children 
but reared Esther's son. Homer Glenn Wells. Esther married Glenn 
E.Wells and she passed away in 1920 leaving the son at the age of 
three years. Homer Williams married Helen G. Fowler of Irving and 
to this union three boys were born; the first dying at birth. 
Those living are John Knight Williams of Atlanta, Georgia and Dr. 
Richard Fowler Williams of Western Springs, Illinois. Emma and 
Pres as they were fondly called, celebrated their Golden Wedding 
Anniversary in 1932. Mrs. Williams passed away in 1936 and Mr. 
Williams in 1938. They are buried in the Irving Cemetery. 



** 



73 



THE REBMAN FAMILY 

Francis Augustus Rebman (1855-1925) son of John and Margaret Hefley 
Rebman was born in Irving. He spent his entire life here as a carpenter 
and cabinet maker. On December 24, 1874, he and Clara Adaline Reilly 
(1859- 1960) were married. To this union 6 children were bornt Oliver; 
Frank who married Alzie Roachj Pearl, wife of Herbert Weller of Hllls- 
boro; Mae, wife of William A.Coffey; Homer who married Mary E, Kruzan; 
Elva, wife of VJ, Jean Granthem of Redondo Boach, Calif. Elva and Pearl 
are the only living children. There are seventeen living grandchildren 
forty-eight great-' grandchildren, s ixty-two great-great-grandchildren - 
There are one hundred twenty-nine living descendants of Augustus and 
Clara Rebman. A. A. A. 

THE TOMAMICHEL FAMILY 

Basillio Tomamichel came from Switzerland at the age of 17 in 1862. 
He married Emma Bostick in 1875 and three sons were born: Jay who died 
in infancy, Joseph and Basillio (Zillie ) .Emma died in 1911 and Basillio 
in 1933. Zillie and Ilene Walcher were married in 1934, He died in 1939 
and his wife in 1962. Joseph married Cleo V/illiam^ in 1906 and 6 child 
ren were born: Twins, Mary Edna who died at birth; Mildred Emma, wife 
of Ralph Clark of Rock Island;Rol Ian who married Esther Peterson lives 
in Belvidere ; Joseph married Wilma Snow, lives in Irving;Everett married 
Grace Eddington, lives in Belvidere ;Estel , wife of John Blair lives in 
Crete. Grandchildren are Kay Tomamichel, Karen and Gary Tomamichel and 
Judy Blair, Earl, Donald, Charles and Bonnie Blair. 

THE J. J. CARRICKER FAMILY. . . 

J.J. Carricker, grandson of Henry and Elizabeth Carricker and son of 
John and Mary (Litucor) Carricker, left Cabaris County, North Carolina 
in 1844 by covered wagon to settle in north Montgomery Co. J. J. Carrie 
ker (1854-1951) and Margaret Morain (1857-1947) eventually resided on 
old home place and owned a sawmill. A family of five:Pearl (1878-1963) 
married in 1901 to Laura Perkins (l 8 74-1 962 ) ; Eurice (1885-1886) jStella 
(1880-1894); Susie Drew F.B. (1886-1955); Feme Bailey V.R. By 1905 he 
had designed, sawed all lumber, except finished lumber, and built a 10 
room house in No. Irving. John Schraudt plasterer. He continued heating 
plumbing, carpentry, and in 1911 he built the Lutheran Church. Grand 
children: Clifford Drew, and Eloyious and James Bailey. Great-grandch- 
ildren: Nancy Kinder and Jimmie Bailey. 

THE GEORGE NEISLER FAMILY . . . . V* .'^ 

George A. Neisler (1885-1951) son of Daniel and Ora Knodle 
Neisler was born in Witt township. He was the fifth son of a family 
of eight boys. He was educated in the public schools of Montgomery 
County. On Sept. 12, 1905, he was united in marriage to Estella V, 
Lemay, daughter of Noah and Anna Rowe Lemay who were natives of 
Circleville, Ohio. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Neisler was blessed with 
two children; Mildred, wife of Mat Wemblinger ; and Drexel, who married 
Romelta Beckmier. The Wemlingers live on a farm in East Fork Township 
owned by Mrs. Neisler and she resides with them. The Neislers have 3 
children; Juanita, wife of James Cassidy, and they have a son Bradley. 
They live in Witt. Barbara, wife of Bradley Caulk, and they have two- 
daughters Cathy and Carol Jo all of Irving, and Myron (deceased) who 
was married to Sonna Matthews and the parents of two children Becky 
and Drexel. In his forty-six years of married life George acquired 
600 acres of land in Fillmore and East Fork townships. Drexel now 
owns the home place and Neisler Feed and Grain. 

74 



OR A AND RUTH 2UMWALT 

Ruth Toberman, daughter of Susan Wright 
Toberman, moved to Irving in 1907, She was a 
telephone operator from September 1920 to Jan 
uary 1940, when the dial system came into ef- 
fect. Henry iVright, brother of Mrs. Toberman 
lived with them many years. In October, 1942 
Miss Toberman moved to Woodriver and was em- 
ployed at Olin Mathieson Plant. She and Ora 
Zumwalt were married in May 1949. They moved 
to Irving, December 1958. They are active mem 
bers of Moncravie Post of American Legion and 
Unit of the Auxiliary. a . t 

THE BAKER FAMILY 

Mr, and Mrs. P. R. Baker Calvin and Adeli 

Golden Wedding their three year old 

Sept. 30, 1959 from Zanesville Town 
farm east of Irving, 
children were born, 
ried Amy Davis Remic 
lived on the farm unt 
to Irving but moved 
1918, remaining there 
Henry S. Baker died i 
in 1929. T'.eir only s 
Elinore Katherine Broo 
a daughter of E . 0. a 
Brookman. They are sti 
er farm where Pearl wa 
have two foster children: Joe Lyng Baker, who is emp 
Air Station in Alameda, California; and Viola Fogle 
S. Burke of Affton, Missouri. 

••••*-*■•••••*••••• 

THE JAf.ES MILTON KELLY FAMILY JAf^ 

James Milton Kelly, son of James 
and Henrietta Kelly was h 'rn in 1834 
in Irving Township. ''e farmed and 
raised Holstein cattle. In 1856, he 
married Rebecca Harkey and to this un- 
ion were born eight children, Laura, 
Flora McDavid, Ben, Louise VJhitten, Dor- 
cas Snell, John, Nellie Atwood, and 
Hattie' Bryan, All now deceased. Later 
he married Lou Mayes and they had four 
daughters, Edith sicaller and Faye Brandt 
of North Hollywood, California and Ethel 
Hunsaker and Edna Spikre, both deceased. 
Grandchildren were Cleo, Esther, and 
Charlie McDavid; Maude, Kelly, Nell, He- 
len, and George Whitten; Donald Bryan; 
Vera, Grace, Mildred, Gladys and Marian 
Snell; R. Vaughn Kelly and Hazel Kelly 
Gardels; Ogden and Woodie Lou Hunsaker; 
Arthur and Robert Quisenberry; and Bet- 
ty ^ee Spikre. Of the twenty-one grand- 
cMldren, five are deceased. 

75 





ne Cass Bake 
son, Henry S. 
ship in 185 

where twelv 
Henry S. Bak 
k in 1885 an 
il 1902. The 
back to the 

until their 
n 192 7 and h 
on, Pearl R. 
kman in 1909. 
nd Jennie Rh 
11 living on 
s born in 188 
loyed at the 
Burke, wife o 



r with- 
moved 
1 to a 
e more 
er mar- 
d they- 
y moved 
farm in 
deaths, 
is wife 
married 
She was 
inehart 
the Bak- 
8. They 
Naval - 
f Otis 



S MILTON KELLY . . . 





DR. W. V. 
and 

ANNA 
PARKHILL 




The Parkhill family sends greetings to all our friends in 
Irving and Montgomery County. Our father, W. V, Parkhill was an 
early physician in the Witt, Irving and Hillsboro areas for over 
fifty years from about 1878. Our mother, Anna Levvey Parkhill was 
a daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Lewey. He was a Union Civil War 
Veteran, who homesteaded a farm near Irving after the Waro 

Mrs. Grace McLean, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 
Dr. Roy C. Parkhill, Evanston, 111. 
Dr. Homer L. Parkhill, Fontiac, 111. 
Harold V. Parkhill, Evanston, 111. 



THE WESLEY W. ViTELLS FAMILY 



Mr. and Mrs. Wesley W. Wells 
60th Wedding Anniversary 




Wesley W. VJells (1855-1942; and Clara Grown (1856-1955) were mar- 
ried March 23, 1880. They came from Nokomis in 1906 and settled on 
a farm one mile south of Irving where they lived until retirement. They 
moved to Witt in 1939 where Mr. Wells died three years later. After 
a few years, Mrs. Wells came back to Irving and lived at the home of 
her son and at Rest Haven until the time of her death, December 23, 
1955. She lived to be ninety-nine yaars, eight months of age. They 
were the parents of one son, Glenn E. Wells; one grandson, Homer Glenn 
Wells; one great-granddaughter, Patricia Wells McMurray; and one 
great-great-grandson, Michael McMurray. 



76 



THE MONCRAVIE FAMILY 

Among the early settlers of Irving were John W, Moncravie (1842 

1914) and his wife Elizabeth Hall Moncravie (1847-1948), They were mar- 
ried in 1870 at Hillsboro and became active in the affairs of this com- 
munity. Their five children were born and reared here, two of whom, 
Jemes and Shirley, lost their lives in France during World VJar 1. Mrs. 
Moncravie's family haH an unusual military history, her husband was a 
Civil War Veteran, and her ancestors served in all the early American 
IVars. There were two granddaughters, the late Miss Nina Baker who 
recently retired after thirty-five years service with the Chicago Mot- 
or Club to make her home here, and Mrs. Susan Moncravie Short, also de- 
ceased. Surviving are t^rce great-grandchildren, eight great-great 

grandchildren, and one great-great-great grandchild. 

THE VOILS-JURGENA FAMILY 

Mary E. Goodnight, daughter of William and Barbary (Isahour ) Good- 
night was married to Fran'r' B. Voils, son of James J. and Esther Delil- 
ah (Earnhart) Voils, on Jan. 19,1883 at the home of Rev. Cromer near 
Irving. Both were natives of North Carolina. They were the parents - 
of five children. The youngest daughter, Ila was married to Wilbur 
Jurgena, second son of Heie and Elizabeth (Guile) Jurgena on April 21, 
1925. One child, a son Harold, was born Nov. 9, 1928. He and Shirley 
Grahain of Winchester were married Jan. 1, 1950. To them two children 
were born, William David and Carol Anne. Harold resides in Irving and 
is employed as Superintendent of Maintenance at Hillsboro Glass Comp 
any, and is present Mayor of Irving. The Jurgena children attend Irv- 
ing Grade School. 

THE FRANK RHINE HART FAMILY 

In 1869 Frank Rhinehart came to Irving from Pennsylvania at the age 
of six. His parents, John and Rebecca Rhinehart built a home on a farm 
one mile east of Irving. In 1893 he married Nancy Lawson of Coffeen and 
they had 6 children, Nellie Cramer, John Rhinehart, Katie Skinner, Nel 
s on (deceased ) , Ruth Conner, and Alice Schoeneweis .Mr . Rhinehart was in 
the implement business and also owned and operated saw mills , threshing 
machines, and hay presses. The family lived in Irving with the except- 
ion of soven or 8 years when they lived in Granite City and St. Louis 
where Mr. Rhinehart did carpenter work. After farming most of his life 
he and his family moved to town in the middle 1920s. Mr. Rhinehart di- 
ed '47 at the age of eighty-three and his wife in 1958 at the age of 
ninety-one. They had thirteen grandchildren and 19 great-f randchildren. 

THE kARVEY KELLY FAMILY 



THE EUGENE P. CARR IKER FAMILY 

Eugene P. Carriker (1860-1954) son of Milliard and Margaret Hefley 
Carriker and Laura Vandever (1862-1911) daughter of Dr. Aaron S. and 
Isabelle Slater Vandever were married and became parents of 8 child- 
ren;Ray who married Lucy Meeks and later married Lulu Thorp; Vera , widow 
of Ralph Winn;Charlie who married Viola Wilson;Ethel who married Homer 
0. Green; Carl who married Ruby Lyerla; Howard; Hugh who married Lena 
Marie Knoll;and Olin who died in infancy. There are nine grandchildren 
and a number of great-grandchildren. Eugene P. Carriker's 2nd marriage 
was to Clara Vandever (1882-1959), daughter of William Cyrus and Sarah 
Eleanor Grantham Vandever. He owned and operated his barber shop in Ir 
ving for fifty-eight years. Surviving members of the family are Vera 
Winn and Charlie Carriker. ^ _^ ^ ^.._ 

THE LAWRENCE A. FILE FAMILY 

Lawrence A. File (1861-1956) son of George and Susannah Cress File 
was born on a farm near Irving. He attended Sunnyside School. In 1886 
he and Elizabeth McDavid (l862-1946)weTe married and located on a farm 
east of Irving. They moved to Irving in 1888 and lived the rest of 
their married life of nearly sixty years. Mr. File entered the Hardware 
business with F.R. Fowler and later, Forrest Lingle joined the firm. Mr 
File was in business around thirty years. After selling his interest in 
the store, he devoted his time to raising fruit and garden. He and his 
wife were active members of the Presbyterian Church and this was a vit 
al part of their lives. They were parents of three children, Viola 
File Loucks, Clinton McDavid File and Evelyn File Emmons. There are 
four grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. 

THE FOWLER FAMILY ^--w^^o w^— w 

Frank Fowler, son of John and Mary C. Osborn Fov/ler, was born in 
Litchfield, 1866. After his father's death, he and his mother came to 
Irving, 1877. In 1879 his mother married Thompson Williams and lived 
on a farm south of Irving until Mr. Williams died, 1894, when she came 
to live with her son. Frank Fowler taught school and nomesteaded in 
Kansas before going into business with L. A. File, 1893. He married 
Ce Dora Belle Parkhill, 1896. The family includes Edna Kelly, Helen 
Williams, Onalee Peters (deceased ) , and Ray who married Lois Klar. Gran 
dchildren are Robert Kelly, Carolyn Kelly Walsh, John K. V/ill iams , Dr. 
Richard Williams, James Peters and Don Fowler. There are six 
grandchildrea. Frank Fowler died, 1935, having been in the hardware- 
business forty-two years. Mrs. Fowler died, 1957. 

THE RUCKER FAMILY 

Frank Rucker (1832-1912) and Caroline Gericke (1840-1924) were 
born in Bruchsal Baden, Germany. He came to New York in 1852 and she 
with her parents. Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Gericke came to St. Louis in 
1850, They settled in Marine, Madison County, where he practiced until 
his death. Frank and Caroline were married, 1866, res iding in Marine un- 
til 1868, when they moved to Raymond Township, living there 8 years, 
moving to Irving Township, 1875. In 1902 they moved to Irving, build 
ing a concrete house across the road from the former Henry Baker resid 
ence. They were parents of 5 children, Martin, Magdelena, Emma, Mary, 
and John. There are eight grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, and 
three great-great-grandchildren. Mary Padgett is the last of her imme- 
diate family. 

78 



THE VANDEVER FAMILY 

William Cyrus Vandever (1851 - 1918), son of Dr. Aaron S. and 
Isabelle Slater Vandever: married Sarah Eleanor Grantham (1853 - - 
1937J, daughter of Isaiah and Margaret Mann Grantham. They were- 
the parents of five sons and five daughters: Miss Lottie, a 
school teacher for forty one years, most of the time in the pri- 
mary room in the Irving School; '.Villiam A. married Mary Catherine- 
Delmore; Isabelle, wife of Tred Lyerla; Charles married Luella J. 
Marshall; Clara, wife of tugene Carrikcr; Elva, wife of Rev. L. 
Hadaway: Voris marri'^j May Harris: Gary married Allene Vawter;- 
Vern married Maude Handley; Leda, wife of Howard Davis. William A. 
established a dry goods store in Tulsa, Okla. in 1904. Later his 
four brothers became his partners. The brothers are all deceased. 
William G., son of Gary is President of the Vandever Company and 
the Vandever shopping center. Surviving members of the family are 
Elva Hadaway and Leda Davis. There are fourteen grandchildren and 
thirty- seven great-grandchildren. 

THE RICHARD LYERLA FAMILY 

Richard Lyerla (1852-1925) son of Solomon and Delilah Williams 
Lyerla, and Serrena Lyerla (185V-1936) were married July 11, 1877. 
They lived on a farm three miles southeast of Irving. Because of ill 
health, they moved to Irving in 1924 where they were residing at the 
time of their deaths. They were the parents oft Fred R, who married 
Belle Vandever (deceased); Abigail, wife of Walter V. Berry; Wood I. 
married Besse Browning; Kathryn, wife of William J. Smith; Ava, wife 
of Glenn E. Wells;and Cleda, wife of Earl S. Burton. The grandchildren 
are: Doris Lyerla (deceased), Reginald Berry, James R. Lyerla, Serena 
Smith Garton (deceased) , Jane Smith Stone, Nancy Burton Harkey, Richard 
Burton and William Burton. There are fourteen great-grandchildren and 
two great-great-grandchildren. 

THE W. H. FILE FAMILY 

William H. File (1863-1961) and Anna Wiley (1867-1962) were married 
1890, living their entire lives in Irving. They observed their 70th 
wedding anniversary in 1960. Mr. File taught school a few years, oper- 
ated a general store, then purchased a half interest in a grain elevat- 
or in 1900. This included a retail coal trade, steam threshing outfit, 
sawmill, and a horse drawn dray. This dray delivered coal, met trains, 
and delivered produce to the merchants .While he operated this business 
he had three different partners, William Wiley, Pearl Carriker, and Ir- 
vin Gregory. In the last years of his business life he bought cream and 
poultry. Mr.andMrs. File were active in the Lutheran Church. They were 
parents of three children, Ina Botkin, Chester and Ivan File. 

THE JOSEPH EDDINGTON FAMILY 

Joseph Eddington II was born in Bunker Hill , 111 inois on Aug- 
ust 28, 1847, and lived there until he was eighteen years of age. 
He and his younger brother Richard, came to Irving Township and 
batched until June 12, 1871, when Joseph married Harriet Tucker. 
They later moved to Witt where they reared four children, Harry, 
Jesse, Otis and Joseph III. Joseph III and Minnie Groner were 
married on February 23, 1904 and moved to a farm one mile west of 
his father's home. In 1944 they moved to Irving. Mr. Eddington 
passed away in 1958. They had three children: Lynn, who lives on 
and farms the home place; Homer, who farms west of Irving; and 
Lois Eddington Hadley, who lives in Witt. There are eight grand 
children and seven great-grandchildren. yg 



IN LOVING MEMORY OF 



flarou K. Vnnde ve r ^ 

(September 4, 1355 — July 9, 1922) 

fnarij hallerVaudever, 

(June 8, 1861— February 8, 1932) 

P rank'} e Va u d e v e r. 

(April 13, 1893— Jun'j 6, 1893) 



—A. E. VANDEVER 

— LESTER K. VANDEVER 



80 




INSIDE FOWLER HARDVMRE STORE 

Frank Fowler and his employee, 
Frank Drev/ who worked in the store 
for many years. The picture was 
taken around 1911o 






^t, 



^n^' ^U 



''^<'^!f^Os^ Of ''U^ 



.:.'^i;' ^ 











^93^^ 3ij^ jy,j^ 






°iv^ 




Ar^Q *Ja?- 






'Of 



CONGRATULATIONS 

IRVING CENTENNIAL 

LAYLE AND ARNOLD INS. AGENCY 



FIRE 

MARINE 

CASULITY 

LIFE & HOSPITAL 

PHONE 322 




SPECIAL CARE GIVEN 
10 DIABETIC CASES 



REST HAVEN. INC. 

iriVINB lULINDIS 



Phoiic Operuled By 

H.uaboro KE 3 lt.1;. Kev. & Mrs L F, 



BONDS 

DRAM SHOP 

HOME 8. FARM 

OWNERS PKG. 

NOKOMIS, ILL. 




CLEAN FRIENDLY 
HOME LIKE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



e.W.'Drapetm.'D. 



HILLSBORO 



ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



HESS FARM MACHINERY 



OPERATED BY 
CLETE HESS 



Nokomis, Illinois 



82 



FIRST IRVING BAND- 1886 

Front row: George Grantham, 
James Grantham, George Denhem, Jos- 
eph Newberry, Milton Romine. 

Back row: Clark Huestis, Daniel 
Grantham, John Grantham, William 
Grantham, Sam Cottrell. 



IRVING BAND - about 1911 

A page from Irving's past, when 
band concerts were weekly occur 
ances is revealed. The picture fai- 
ls to show the band platform which 
stood on Main Street. The concerts 
were a part of the social life of 
the village and were well attended. 

A band which was organized - 
in 1904, practiced weekly in the Hue- 
stis building and later in the work 

shop, Augustus Rebman. Among the 

leaders were Oliver Lipe, A. Dick 
Mowrey and Jean Grantham. 

P.R. Baker is the only member- 
of the 1911 band still living in 
the Irving community. 

Pictured left to right, front 
row: Howard Stewart, Owen Mowrey,P. 
R. Baker, Homer K. l^illiams, Clint- 
on File . 

Back row: Brazil Tomamichel, 
Lester Truitt, William Shreve, Char 
les Tobias, Frank Grantham, Olive 
r lipe, Shirley Moncravie, Jean Gra 
ntham, Forrest Williams, a.E. Mow- 
rey. 





IRVING NATIONAL BANK 

Pictured in 1907, the Irving- 
National Bank functioned for many- 
years. The bank doors were closed on 
March 31, 1931 and was taken over 
by the Hillsboro National Bank with 
no loss to the depositors. 

Hilton Berry served as cashier 
for many years. Ross Jarrett was as 
sistant cashier for a few years and 
when .'-'r. Berry retired, Mr. Jarret-t 
was cashier until the bank closed. 



83 



LAURENT ^ 



TEXACO 



^ SERVICE 

or) 



MOTOR TUNE UP 

WHEEL BALANCING 

BATTERYS PICK UP AND DELIVERY 



PHONE KE 2 2800 

418 SOUTH MAIN ST. HILLSBORO, ILLINOIS 



84 



FAMILIAR SCENE IN TIIE F0Rf4ER 
BOTKIN RESTAURANT 



E uch 
were 
ure^d 
Geor 
back 
Burk 
by. 



In the 19-505 a Pinochle and 

re Club was formed and games 

played in the restaurant. Pict 

are John Kluthe, W.H, Haller, 

ge Pope and the man viith his 

to the camera is unknown. Ed 

e is seated on the bench near 





^ FIRE IN 1951 

Among the many fires, the Kelly 
Mercantile Store and Ralph Athey 
Grocery Store burned to the ground. 
The Old Post Office Building at the 
right was damaged but was later 
repaired. 



FORf.ER CLJ IRVING HOUSE A 

Brick house on Fine Street, bu 
ilt by VV.Vif. Wiley in the 1300s. Mrs. 
S. Mason is shown in front of her 
hoi'.e in 1947. The house was sold 
and torn down in 1959. 





ONE OF THE OLDER HOUSES 



The former D. W. Burton house 
was built many years ago, the foun- 
dation being of logs. It is now- 
occupied by Mrs. Pearl Schoeneweis. 



BOY SCOUT QUARTET - ABOUT 1914 

Front row: Harold Blizzard, 
Owen Mowrey. 

Back row: Chester Walcher. - 

Homer Williams. ' 



85 




COMPLIMENTS OF 



LAMAR CAULK 



KENNETH CAULK 




PHONE KE 3-4432 



TRUCKING SERVICE 



IRVING. ILL. 



CONGRATULATIONS IRVING ON YOUR CENTENNIAL 




OUTSTANDING SERVICE AND FIRST QUALITY 
MERCHANDICE AT LOW PRICES WILL BE OUR GOAL 
WE PLEDGE COMPLETE SATISFACTION OR YOUR MONEY 
REFUNDED. 

SAVE TWO WAYS WITH US LOW PRICES AND TOP VALUE STAMPS 
HILLSBORO LITCHFIELD 



86 







FORIVER RURAL MAIL CARRIERS 



W. H. Haller was a rural mail carrier for many years, starting in 
1906 and retiring in 1937. Shown in front of the barn at the Haller 
home is Mr. Kaller and his mail wagon. The picture was taken in 1930. 



^~ The famous "Puddle Jumper" and its creator, Walter Neisler who 

was a rural mail carrier for forty-three years. 




"POSSUM CLUB" — 1897 



Front row: Perry Lipe, Oliver Lipe, Ed Cockelreas, Back row : 
Athey Bryan, C.L. Cockelreas, W.A. Vandever, Walter McDowell, William 
Padgett, Robert L. Funk. 

87 



Compliments Of 



®r. herbert Sirflrsen W.O. 



524 SOUTH MAIN ST, 



Hillsboro, 



Illinois 



Compliments of 




Phone KE 2-5188 



WHALEN IMPLEMENT 
AND REPAIR 

1556 School Street 
GEORGE A. WHALEN 



TRACTORS 



Hillsboro, Illinois 



KE-2-2911 



Compliments of 
GOBETTO'S PHONO SERVICE 

Taylor Springy 



ELMER COBETTO 



Compliments of 

HALLER'S MOTOR SALES 



CENTRAL ILL. COMMUNITY AUCTION 
R0UTE127 



SALES EVERY FRIDAY 7:00 P. M. 



HAM HHLLERS 
KE2 2911 



JOHN CORSAGE 
KE2 9001 



88 




OLD MAIN STREET SCENES IN THE 18908 




AN OLD PHAETON OF THE 1900» 

Pictured are Mr. and Mrs. Jacob 
Grantham with their dog, Pup and 
horse, Fannie. The Grantham* were 
grandparents of Louise Everley and 
Selma Eddington. 



89 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



TOWN TAVERN 



PACKAGE LIQUOR AND BEER 



JAMES DALZOTTO - Owner 



PH. KE-3-4342 
IRVING, ILL. 



Best Wishes 
DON'S FARM SUPPLY 

SALES AND SERVICE 
Your Allis Chalmers Dealer 



1140 School St. 



Phone KE 2-3488 



Hillsboro, III. 



Large Enough 
To Accomodate 



— Compliments Of — 

First National 
Bank 

Of Nokomis 



Small Enough 
To Appreciate 



NOKOMIS 



Compliments of 



STIEHL-DAWSON FUNERAL HOMES 



Nokomis 



QO 



Witt 




BARTLETT RESTAURANT 

-Many Years Ago 
Pictured in front of the Bartlett 
Restaurant are Ross Bandy, Karry Bart- 
lett, Maude Williams and A. H. Bartl- 
ett. The Restaurant was owned and ope- 
rated by Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Bartlett and 
was located at the site of the former 
Botkin Restaurant. The man at the far- 
left is unknown. 



AN:^'A HA3EY HONORED 

Pictured are schoolmates of 
Anna Kabey at a tea given in her 
honor in 1950. Front row: Prudence 
Coffey, Belle Hughes, Lura Tucker, 
Anna Habey-Back row: /^nna rile,'.Vill 
iam File and tv/c unknown. 




BEAUX AND BELLES OF 1898 

Cecil Kelly, Faye Kelly, Madge 
Kelly, Ruby Latham, Logan McDowell, 
Homer Crissman, Clarence McDowell, 
Harry Snell. 




SIGNAL TOWER IN 1907 

Among the operators in the tow- 
er were. Will Crouch, Mr. Collins, 
Charles Sullivan, Hardin Cook, and 
Bill Thompson. 



Remember when a big red quarantine sign v/as posted 
on any house where there was a contagious disease? 



Remember when there were hitching racks on most of 
the main streets, at the churches and around the park? 



91 



PROTECT YOUR LOVED ONES BETTER 



Betty B, Edwards 

Allen Edwards 

owners 



Our Vaults 
Sealed Both 

Automatically 
and 

Mechanically 




Montgomery County Vault Service 



PHONE KE3 4510 



IRVING, ILLINOIS 



CONGRATULATIONS . . , 



YOUR A. G. STORE 
SHURFINE FOODS 



IVAN CAULK 

AND SON 

ROBERT CAULK 



IRVING, ILL. 



CONGRATULATIONS . . . 

1863 - IRVING CENTENNIAL — 1963 



MR. ii MRS. WADE L. CAULK 



PITTSBURGH 



PENNSYLVANIA 



92 




The pictured garage was built in 

about 1911 by Tony and Humbert Ludewi- 
ck and was one of the first public garag 
es and automobile agencies in Montgomery 
County. The brothers sold Maxwell cars. 

Forest Lingle and son, Ivan bought 
the garage in 1912 and continued to oper 
ate the business until 1928, when they — 
rented the building to others. 



STORES Or THE PAST 




REPUBLICAN LADIES' CLUB OF IRVING 
ABOUT 1900 



THE CHARLES CUNDIFF HO;/E \ 
-about 1896 

Located at the site of the for- 
mer home of Ruby Carriker, now the 
Myrl Lewis Home. Across the road 
was a molasses mill operated by Mr. 
Cundiff. 




93 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



*} %UM^ ^^iK'^O'tCKdt^ 



IVAN CAULK 

AND SON 
ROBERT CAULK 



OPEN 6A.M. TO 10 P.M. 



IRVING, ILL. 




CONGRATULATIONS call me 

TO IRVING anytime 

CENTENNIAL 

FROM YOUR 

NEWSPAPER 

CARRIER 

Illinois State Journal Post Dispatch 
Illinois State Register Globe Democrat 
Decatur Herald Chicago American 

DAILY SUNDAY HOLIDAYS 

JOHN MARTINCIC JR. KE34354 



COMPLIMENTS OS OF 



HILLSBORO 

BOWL 




CHUCK & MARY KNISLEY 



KE 2 3654 



CONGRATULATIONS 



EAST SEWARD ST. 
HILLSBORO, ILL. 



St. Glair Ice & Fuel Co. 

BLOCK ICE, SIZE & CUBES 
ICE FOR EVERY OCCASION 



KE 2 5311 



94 




^JEW YORK CENTRAL ENGINE AND CREW 
--1952 

This engine No. 3061 was used 
to pull a Speno machine which clean, 
ed the ballast along the New York 
Central right of way, the biggest 
engine that was ever run west of 
Mattoon. The operating crew was Gl- 
enn E. -Veils, engineer and C.B. Ful- 
ler of Coffeen, fireman. 

Mr. I'iells was associated with 
the New York Central Railroad for 
over forty years. He is pictured - 
at the front of the engine while at 
wor k . 



CIVIL WAR VETERANS 

Left to right: John Moncravie, 
Mr. Saunders, Captain Al Rhinehart, 
Thomas Grantham, and Lige Pruitt, 
Mr. Grantham was the father of Mrs 
L. R, Hammond. 




FILE AND WILEY ELEVATOR 
IN THE EARLY 1900s 

Later, the business was File 
and Carriker (Pearl) and File and 
Gregory (irvin). 



FORMER OLD RHINEHART HOr^E 



<r 



The former Rhinehart home and 
members of the Rhinehart and Brook- 
man families in front. Later Occupi 
ed by Mr. and Mrs. Ray Lyerla, the 
house burned and the owner, W.A.Van- 
dever built a new house on the site. 
It was bought by Mr. and Mrs. Cecil 
Schmedeke who live there now. 



95 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

CANTON INN 




MIXF-D DRINKS 

AND 

FINE FOODS 



ACE & RENA McCASLIN PROP. 
RT. 16 HILLSBORO,' ILL. 



AIR CONDITION 

AND 

TELEVISION 



PHONE KE-2-2108 



BEST WISHES ON THE CENTENNIAL 
FROM THE 
WHITE STAR 

ROLLER RINK 

NOKOMIS, ILL. 



FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

BIG SELECTION OF PLANTS, 

CORSAGES AND BOUQUETS 

CHOOSE HERE FROM FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

FOR YOUR GARDEN EVERY OCCASION 

WELCOfvE TO THE 



Masulis Flower & Plant Shop 

JAMES & JOSEPHINE MASULIS 
DELIVERIES PHONE 58K 



CONGRATULATIONS . , , 

TO IRVING ON ITS 
ONE HUNDRETH BIRTHDAY 
1863 1963 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



JOHN W. SMITH 

livestock hauling 

PHONE RAYMOND 8418 



S»6 




FIRST CAR IN IRVING AND ONE CF THE OLDER HOMES 

The Julius Carriker home was designed and built by Mr. Carriker 
about 1896, when he sawed rough lumber at his farm for the framework. 
The family car, a Lambert is thought to be the first car owned by an 
Irving resident. 

Pearl Carriker and his sister Fern are standing by the car and 
seated inside are Mr. and Mrs. Julius Carriker in front and Susie and 
Laura Carriker in the back. 




SENSATIONAL INCIDENT 



One of the exciting events in 
about 1916 was the landing of an 
airplane in a pasture in the west 
part of the village, where many peo 
pie enjoyed 15 minute rides for a 
fee of $5. each. 



97 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



HARDY'S GARAGE 

& 
REPAIR SERVICE 



SCHOENEWEIS GARAGE 



USED CAR DEALERSHIP 

IRVING, ILLINOIS 



Butler's Speed Wash 

COIN OPERATED LAUNDRY S. DRY CLEANER 
HILLSBORO, ILL. 113 7 VANDALIA RD. 1620 SCHOOL ST. 

RRVmODP HRnov-UBSM 

COIN OPERATED LAUNDRY 
RAYMOND, ILL. 



98 




AN OLD IRVING MOUSE 



The house ov;ned 
was built Tiany ye 
Bnation about it 
left was built on 
outside door for 
who lived there 
Marion Satterlee, 
riker, Poole and 
ilies. It is now 
rgnan family who 
rley. 



by Mrs. Charles Everley 
ars agoo The First info 
was that the roon at tht 
by Dr.Whitten with an 
his office. Among others 
were the John R. Kelly, 
T.R. Coffey, CO. Car- 
Charles Everley, fam- 
occupied by the Jake Be 
rents it from Mrs. Eve- 




GRANTHAM MILLINERY STOIE 

The Millinery store operated by 
Rose Grantham between 1910 and ear- 
ly 1920s was located in the present 
American Legion Hall Building. 

Pictured are Nina Grantham and 
Rose Grantham. Nina was a niece of 
Rose and assisted In making and sel- 
ling hats. 




IRVING'S BIG DAY-1912 

Illinois Governor Deneen made 
a whistle stop in Irving and spoke 
from the rear of the train. 



A STUDY CLASS — 1912 

Front row: Ethel Stump Neisler, 
Burrell Neisler, Rev. Neff, Mr. 
Crosby, Belle Sturgis. 

Middle row: Marshall Winn, Gra 
ce Stump, Alberta White. 

Back row: Mrs. Neff, Sophia Kel- 
ly, Hattie Lynch, Bertha Grantham, 
Esther Schraudt, Lillie Huestis. 




99 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



^^ A r\ *.i TD ft r D A ni 



RADIO & TV SERVICE 



ADMIRAL RADIOS 8, TELEVISIONS 
LITCHFIELD, ILL. 
110 N. STATE ST. 
LITCHFIELD PHONE 324 3315 



IRVING KE 3 4448 



FORf/ER STATE OWNED 

TRUCKS 8. FARM 

TRACTORS 



-rOP$VALUc 

Jeep OJUI ^ 

TftUCKLAND 



SIZES a MODELS 



lOOTO CHOOSE FROM 



PHONE 
522—8806 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



INTERNATIONAL MOTOR TRUCKS 



412 NORTH JEFFERSON ST. 
LITCHFIELD, ILLINOIS 

PH0NE324 — 3210 



COMPLIf^ENTS OF 



Finley's Pharmacy 



STORE KE2 9008 
PRESCRIPTION DEPT. KE2 5060 
PROFESSIONAL PRESCRIPTION SERVICE 
WALTER T. FINLEY 
B.S. Ph., R. PH. 



3005. MAIN 
HILLSBORO, ILL. 



100 




AN OLD IRVING MOUSE 

The house ov;ned by Mrs. Charles Everley 
was built many years agoo The First info 
mmation about it was that the roor; at tht 
left was built on by Dr.Whitten with an 
outside door for his office. Among others 
who lived there were the John R. Kelly, 
Marion Satterlee, T.R. Coffey, CO. Car- 
riker, Poole and Charles Everley, fam- 
ilies. It is now occupied by the Jake Be 
rgman family who rents it from Mrs. Eve- 
rley. 




A STUDY CLASS — 1912 

Front row: Ethel Stump Neisler, 
Burrell Neisler, Rev. Neff, Mr, 
Crosby, Belle Sturgis. 

Middle row: Marshall Winn, Gra 
ce Stump, Alberta White. 

Back row: Mrs. Neff, Sophia Kel- 
ly, Hattie Lynch, Bertha Grantham, 
Esther Schraudt, Lillie Huestis. 



GRANTHAM MILLINERY STOTIE 

The Millinery store operated by 
Rose Grantham between 1910 and ear- 
ly 19208 was located In the present 
American Legion Hall Building. 

Pictured are Nina Grantham and 
Rose Grantham. Nina was a niece of 
Rose and assisted in making and sel- 
ling hats. 




IRVING'S BIG DAY-1912 

Illinois Governor Deneen made 
a whistle stop in Irving and spoke 
from the rear of the train. 




99 



COMPLIMENTS OF # 



RADIO & TV SERVICE 



ADMIRAL RADIOS & TELEVISIONS 
LITCHFIELD, ILL. 
110 N. STATE ST. 
LITCHFIELD PHONE 324 3315 IRVING fCE 3 4448 



FORf^ER STATE OWNED PHONE 

TRUCKS & FARM 522—8806 

TRACTORS 



TRUCKLANO 

ALL. MAKES - SIZES & MODEUS 



lOOTO CHOOSE FROM 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



INTERNATIONAL MOTOR TRUCKS 



412 NORTH JEFFERSON ST. 
LITCHFIELD, ILLINOIS 

PH0NE324 — 3210 



COMPLIf^NTS OF 



Finley's Pharmacy 

STORE KE2 9008 
PRESCRIPTION DEPT. KE2 5060 
PROFESSIONAL PRESCRIPTION SERVICE 
WALTER T. FINLEY 3OOS. MAIN 

B.S. Ph., R. PH. HILLSBORO, ILL. 



100 



I.H.S. BASKET BALL TEAM 
1911-1912 

Front row: Ray Lyerla, Corwin 
King, Theodore Cramer.Back row: Cli 
nton File, Roy Tucker, Coach Roy 
Parkhill, Dwight Barnett, Ivan Lin- 
gle. 







I.H.S. BASKET BALL TEAM 
1914 

Homer McHugh, Owen Mowrey, Che 
ster File, Dv/ight Barnett, Orin Cre 
ss. Coach Ivan Lingle, Chester Wal- 
cher. 



I.H.S. BASKET BALL TEAM 
1921-1922 

Kenneth Path, Wilbur White, - 
[larry Grimes, Coach Woolford, Lawr 
ence Truitt, Leland Hefley, Luther 
Hutchins . 



I.H.S. IRVING EAGLES 
1945-1946 

The 1945-46 basket ball team 
made quite a name for itself. Accoi 
ding to the Irving High School Year 
Book of that school term the team 
broke tv^o all-state records for a 
single season. They stepped past the 
all-state record for team scoring 
by collecting 2511 points in 39 gam 
es. Dale V/hite (No. 55) broke the in 
dividual scoring record by rolling 
up 988 points in 38 games. 

Pictured, the team, cheerlead- 
ers, coach and teachers. 

Front Row: Louis Athey, Mrs. 
Throgmartin, Juanita Bailey, Wanda 
Lyerla, Annie Morei-ead, Helen Edd 
ington, Ava Wells, James White. 

Back Rov;: Leroy Kluthe, Haro- 
ld Grill, Bradley Caulk, Russell Ha 
rtman. Dale White, Harry Everley, 
Kenneth Christian, Coach Podshadley 








Compliments Of 








Merry Company 

GENERAL MACHINING 




Walter 


MERRY 




237 H«i.Ti««R Stbcit 
Rivin RouiiE IS, MiCHiciAN 






Compliments Of 




KLEANERETTE 






• • 


. SELF-SERVICE 


: DRY CLEANING 




ACROSS FROM HILLSBORO 


HOTEL 


122 EAST SEWARD STREET 


HILLSBORO, ILLINOIS 


PHONE KEIlogg 2-9071 


AS 

• • 


YOU 
. ASK 


FARM , 
US 


Ml 

STANDARD) 


DOV 


ALEXANDER 


AGENT 


PHONE-V/ITT-4 196-2661 






Compliments of 








DRS. GEORGE AND 
TELFER 


JIM 






Hillsboro, Illinois 





102 




A FLOCK OF SNOW BIRDS. 

The picture taken in 1947 shows some of the older men who lived 
for many years in the Irving community and all of whom are now deceas- 
ed. Ages of the men at that time ranged from 80 to 92 years. 

Front row, left to right: E. P. Carriker, E. A. Lyerla, Frank P. 
King, J. J. Carriker, Frank Berry, and Albert White- Back row: Martin 
Davis, William Stewart, W. H. File, Dr. P. H, Winans, L. A. File, John 
Klein, James Calhoun, and Luke Fath. 



THE NOTSON JEWELRY STORE AND 
D.W. BURTON BUTCHER SHOl- 

The buildings are now owned bv 
Stanley Everley and are located or 
the East side of Main Street. 

Pictured are Mr. Notson, D. 'H . 
Burton and father, George Burton. 




THRESHING MACHINE IN ACTION 

About 50 years ago, Frank Rhine 
hart owned and operated a threshing 
machine, which he took to many farms 
in Irving Township as well as sur- 
rounding townships. 



103 





NOKOMIS QUARRY 



p. 0. BOX 8 



NOKOMIS ILLINOIS 



PHONE 82 




QUARRY OWNER'S 
GIBSON'S BROS. 
ERNIE AND PETE 



LAND ONERS 
MR. L MRS. 
IKE SMITH 



104 




T.R. COFFEY SHOE STORE - 1910 

The store was a part of the 
present restaurant building. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 




uean, tasy-ncKing 
PIONEER Corn... 

ORDER YOURS 
FROM — 

Edward Hubar, Hillsboro 
H. Lynn Eddington, Irving 

Padan Bros., Hillsboro 
Howard Ward, Butler 




IRVING WATER TOWEK 

Constructed, 1961 - water offici 
ally turned on, January 2, 1962. 



Peoples Bank 
Of Pana 



105 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



L^ 



le^ 



e^ 



w 



HAVE BATON WILL TRAVEL 
JEANIE WEBER WITT, ILL. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 



HUCKER'S RADIO & T. V. 

ZENITH a RCA — PHIICO — MOTOROLA 

FAIRGROUND AT SOUTH MAIN ST. 
HILLSBORO ILL. KE2 3121 



Plant 




HYBRIDS 



Are You? 




If nof, you should see for yourself what these h!gh 
yielding hybrids can do for you. Thousands of corn 
belt farmers have planted Bo-Jac Hybrids and remain 
as loyal customers year after year for they have found 
thef can plant Bo-Jac with confidence. Confidence 
that comes from consistently superior yields of high 
quality corn off of standing stalks that really hold 
onto their ears. Plant Bo-Jac and you too will be con- 
vinced •— see your Bo-Jac dealer today. 

Vou-1 Local Ve.alzM a^e: 

AlbufL-t lapanci and Flank Zupanc-i 



l/L.Wh.te^ 



COFFEEN, ILL. 



CASH DONATIONS 

WESTERN AUTO 

KOVIC'S TAP 

MAX FRAILEY TAXI 

KONOMOS 

■MRS ESSIE CAULK 

FLOYD CRUMLEY 
RAYMOND FOOD MKT . 
HILLSBORO HOTEL 
HERMAN CHUMLEY 
AARON WHITE 
DRUM KETTLEKAMP 



COMPLIMENTS OF 







CHICAGO DECATUR ST. LOUIS 



AIR CONDITION 
LAVATORY EQUIPPED 



\ Oft 



Compliments of 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Of Litchfield, Illinois 

Oldest Bank In Montgomery County 
MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



Established 1860 DEPOSITS INSURED UP TO $10,000.00 incorporated 1889 
■ ■ — — < — 

CONGRATULATIONS 



©rt/ws FuuLTuI llonw 



PHONE 3 9 



NOKO.MIS ILLINOIS 



COMPLI.'.ENTS OF 



^A^ 



0*^ 



kcr 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



6 

CUSTOM BUILT HOi\ES PLANNING SERVICE 



PHONE KE-2-5275 or KE-2-3177 



BEST WISHES TO IRVING CENTENNIAL 



^^B« ^ -^y 



SPECIALIZING IN WEDDING AND PARTY CAKES 
WITT, ILL. PH. 2571 

107 




For Those Who 

Think Young! 





Pepsi, please 



COMPLIMENTS OF . . . 



NELSON AUTO SALES & SERVICE 




THERES SOfiffiTHING EXTRA 
ABOUT OiVNING AN OLDSMQBILE 

NEW STYLE TO DELITE YOU 
ROCKET ACTION TO EXCITE YOU 

SEE YOUR OLDS MOBILE JEALEP 
FOR A GOOD DEAL 



FRED NELSON OiUJER 



108 



Cempllmantt of 



FREEBURG 

CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 

WATER WORKS SEWERS 



MUNICIPAL FINANCING 



ASSISTANCE OUR SPECIALTY 



FOR INFORMATION CALL 

LENNOX 9 - 4133 

FREEBURG ILLINOIS 



109 




BRYCE AND SON COAL, 
FEED AND FLOUR STORE-1914 

Shown standing by the horses is 
Ralph Bryce and others pictured 
from left to right are Wash Smith, 
Homer O.Green, and Chester Hartman. 
At the right is Funk's Poultry Hou- 
se, operated by Robert L. Funk. 



Remember when bustles and leg-o-mutton 
sleeves were the order of the day? 



Remember when the Artesian well was 
the popular place for picnics and camping? 



Remember when Irving had a taxi service, 
any place in town for a jitney (nickel)? 



110 




SCENES AT IRVING DEPOT IN THE 1930s 

In the foreground is Tom Padg- 
ett and standing by the loading tr- 
uck is Will Padgett who for many 
years was ticket agent. In the back 
ground is the hand car house where 
tools of the section crew were kept. 



IRVING CREAfvERY 

Among the operators many years 
ago were Tony Ludewick, E.S. Blizz- 
ard, .Mr. Burns, Mr. Gchubert, and 
Arthur Rhodes. 

The picture was taken in the 
summer of 1907, 










P.P. COCKELREAS GENERAL STORE 

Taken during a drawing at the 
store in the early 1900s. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



V/e, the committee, submit this book as a 
souvenir of Irving's Centennial. 

Our sincere thanks to the printer, Robert 
Davis, for his work and the attractive cover, 
to all who bought space, to those who, because 
of their interest, furnished information, cli 
ppings, pictures, and gave of their time and 
effort. 

This has enabled us to trace somewhat the 
pattern of change through the transition per- 
iod of a century. 



Ill 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE PEOPLE OF IRVING 

ON YOUR CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 



MDNTGDMERY SERVICE COMPANY 



A FARMER OWNED SERVICE 



BUTLER 
KE2 3491 



HILLSBQRO 
KE2 2011 



NOKGMIS 
339 



I@J 



DISTRIBUTORS OF 




PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



FEEDS AND SEEDS 



FERTILIZERS 



BULK BLEND 



LIQUID NITROGEN 



PROPANE GAS 



BOTTLE 



BULK 



WATER HEATERS 



STOVES 



APPLIANCES 



ELIVATOR SERVICE 



112 



7200-S49« 
PB-15 



■Rm-m^®^ 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 

977 382IR8I C001 

IRVING CENTENNIAL, 1863-1963 IRVING, IL 



3 0112025398097